CATALOG OF GRANARY PUBLICATIONS
(Click here for our illustrated & printed Granary Catalog)
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
A 
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
(NOTE: catalogued by author/artist's last name)

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P |
Q |
R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A - B

David Antin & Charles Bernstein, A Conversation with David Antin. June 2002. 6 1/2" x 9" 168 pp, edition of 2000. "The Review of Contemporary Fiction was preparing an issue on my work and they wanted to include a new interview to go along with six or seven critical essays. Over the years I'd been interviewed a fair number of times by some very able critics, but I thought it might be interesting to try something different. Not so much an interview as a conversation—with another poet, a younger poet whose mind and work I found powerfully meaningful. I immediately thought of Charles, his wide-ranging mind, his openness to all sorts of genres and modes, his quickness, his lightness, his seriousness... .And there were obvious similarities in our interests and backgrounds. We're both dedicated experimentalists, both poet-critics, both New York and secular Jewish. But there were great differences. We started from two different worlds. I was born into the Great Depression and he was born into the Cold War eighteen years later. I came into the art and literary worlds of the late fifties, he entered in the seventies. We would have a lot to talk about, and we talked about doing it. I went East for an opening at the Whitney. Charles came out to San Diego to read a paper. Since I'm a 'talk poet' and Charles a voluble talker, we thought we should do it face to face for audiotape. But since I live on the West Coast and he lives on the East Coast, this was difficult to arrange. At a conference on American poetry in Amiens we decided we might as well do it by e-mail, which offers some of the immediacy of talking together with the elaboration possibilities of writing. The electronic speed of transmission made it a kind of cross between the 18th century and the 21st. The elaboration process led us to a four month interchange we enjoyed so much it ran more than twice the length we could use in The Review of Contemporary Fiction. This book is our whole uncut dialogue." Offset. Bound in paper wrappers. Twenty-six copies are signed by David Antin and Charles Bernstein. ISBN 1-887123-55-5. PB. $12.95.

John Ashbery & Joe Brainard, The Vermont Notebook. 2001. 9 1/2" x 6 3/4"; Poetry by Ashbery with over 50 ink drawings by Brainard. "This is John Ashbery at his wacky best, from long lists that seem to make some sense, to short lists that are befuddling and beguiling, to made-up diary entries. Perhaps it's everyone's diary that Ashbery has written, and no one's. Joe Brainard's silhouetted Americana becomes the perfect complement. There's a wonderfully nutty innocence (insouciance) to this book that is found in Brainard's drawings and Ashbery's writings: 'his lips spell out the words: shale, cowturds, spread, udder, mumps.'" ã John Yau. ". . .touched with genius." ã Peter Schjeldahl. ISBN 1-887123-59-8. $15.95.

John Ashbery & Joe Brainard, The Vermont Notebook Broadside. 2002. $200.

Marina Adams & Leslie Scalapino, The Tango. (see Leslie Scalapino).

Susan Bee, Talespin. New York. Granary Books. 1995. 11" x 8 1/2"; 44 pages; edition of 40 (30 for sale; 10 hors commerce). Cloth over boards. Inspired in part by the melodramas & mysteries published in popular magazines of the 1880s, Susan Bee's Talespin evokes a contrasting sensibility: images of childhood mingle with the unexpected dangers and pitfalls of adulthood. The theme that emerges from this stream of associations is a Blakean loss of innocence and gaining of experience with a healthy dose of feminism and postmodern irony thrown in. The sub themes of the book are violence, desire, romance, procreation, sex, birth, death-expressionism leavened with grains of humor and fantasy. Susan Bee's collages were printed offset on Rives BFK, then hand-painted. Bound by Daniel E. Kelm and staff at The Wide Awake Garage. (Out-of-print).

Susan Bee and Charles Bernstein (see Charles Bernstein).

Susan Bee and Jerome Rothenberg, The Burning Babe & Other Poems. (see Jerome Rothenberg).

Susan Bee and Johanna Drucke, A Girl's Life. (see Johanna Drucker).

Susan Bee and Susan Howe, Bed Hangings. (see Susan Howe).

Guy Bennett and Béatrice Mousli, Charting the Here of There: French & American Poetry in Translation in Literary Magazines, 1850–2002. 2002. 7" x 10" 166 pp. A companion to the New York Public Library exhibition "Reviews of Two Worlds: French-American Literary Periodicals, 1945–2000." Written by Guy Bennett & Béatrice Mousli (co-curators of the New York Public Library exhibition), Charting the Here of There contains a world of French-American exchange — a world governed by back-and-forth, double conciousness, the magic inherent in translation and mistranslation, as well as the fantastic, poetic mystery and possibility which comes out of this articulation "across the pond." Bennett and Mousli document the high points of this ongoing exchange as it writes itself on the pages of French and American literary magazines from 1850 through to the present. The result is an impeccable over-view of production testifying to the undeniable, often indefinable bond joining French and American poetry. ISBN 1-887123-63-6. $24.95 PB.

Charles Bernstein and David Antin, A Conversation with David Antin. (see David Antin).

Charles Bernstein and Susan Bee, Little Orphan Anagram. New York. Granary Books. 1997. 11" x 8 1/2"; Letterpress, handcoloring. Edition of 35 (10 hors commerce, 25 for sale). According to the New York Times this companion volume to Susan Bee's Talespin has "real visual éclat." Texts by Charles Bernstein. Printed at Soho Letterpress then hand painted. Bound by Daniel Kelm and staff at the Wide Awake Garage. ISBN: 1-887123-14-8. (Out-of-print).

Charles Bernstein and Susan Bee, Log Rhythms. New York. Granary Books.1998. 11" x 8 1/2"; In this book Susan Bee sets and illustrates a long serial poem by Charles Bernstein, offering a running visual dialogue with the poem's textual acrobatics. Together they explore the psychopathology of everyday life: at times dark, at times dizzyingly demented, swerving from the wildly comic to the searingly political and from the whimsical to the elegiac. Printed offset (black ink on white paper) by Brad Freeman. Cover designed by Philip Gallo and Susan Bee then laser-printed in color at the Hermetic Press; edition of 500; 24 pp. Wrappers. ISBN: 1-887123-25-3. $35.

Charles Bernstein and Mimi Gross, Some of These Daze, 2005.(see Mimi Gross)

Charles Bernstein and Jay Sanders, editors. Poetry Plastique (see Jay Sanders)

Ted Berrigan and George Schneeman, In The Nam What Can Happen?. New York. Granary Books. 1997. 8 1/4" x 9 1/4"; Letterpress in several colors. Edition of 70 (20 hors commerce, 50 for sale). In The Nam was first made as a one-of-a-kind collaborative book in 1967-68. The original was passed back and forth between Ted Berrigan and George Schneeman for about a year, remaining in the hands of one or the other for weeks or even months at a timeãpoet and artist each adding, subtracting, working over words and images. The materials used were pen & ink, white acrylic paint and collage. The work was made primarily for the amusement of the collaborators, thus the „finished¾ project languished in a drawer in Mr. Schneeman's studio on St. Mark's Place for thirty years. Produced when the Vietnam War was rapidly escalating, this work is by turns surreal, incisive, hip, outrageous, cartoon-like, flip, sinister, humorous, dreamy, sarcastic, wittyãalways right on targetãa vivid evocation of the times & the broad range of emotional responses to the War. „With its constant layering of word and image and the cumulative impact of overlapping and colliding forms, collage is essential to this work. All sheets make use of it, and there is often a playful, old-fashioned tone to the pastiched elementsãan equestrian magazine from the 1930s, for instance, is followed up by colorful, outdated print advertisements or bits of gift wrappingœThe words derive their impetus from the visual ground; they are at once part of and a commentary on their situation in this visual-verbal complex.¾ (Vincent Katz, Art on Paper.) The present edition is a simulation of the original & was printed letterpress, in several colors, from magnesium plates on Rives 300 gm paper by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. $1200.

(Ted Berrigan) Aaron Fischer, Ted Berrigan: An Annotated Checklist. New York. Granary Books. 1998. 070 pages, 10" x 7"; 1000 in wrappers, 52 bound in boards. A poignant introduction by Lewis Warsh sets the stage for this fascinating glimpse into the inner workings of the literary underground. More than a mere checklist, the book is peppered with anecdotes and comments from many of Ted's friends and publishers, including Anne Waldman and Ron Padgett. Illustrated with 27 "literary pictures"--previously unpublished collaborations by Berrigan and painter George Schneeman in the late sixties. ISBN: A-Z: 1-887123-15-6 (out-of-print); 1-26 numbered and signed. ISBN: In Boards 1-887123-16-4 (out-of-print); Trade Paper 1-887123-17-2. $32.95.


bill bissett, Lunaria. 2001. 11" x 8 1/2"; 83 pages, edition of 40. From the pages of bill bissett's Lunaria come moments filled with searching and illumination. Sights and experiences from "les moon rayze" to "happeeness in ths short life" are woven into expressive drawings and explorations of language. "[In bill bissett's books] the surface is not contextualized—it is not a surface of, under, or around anything—but the flow of force itself, obliterating insides and outsides, and freeing writing from the domain of the categorical....The books are not to be conceived solely from the viewpoint of their utility, but also from their character as flow, intensity and force: the urge of the words through and between the books, as if language, whilst inhering in their formats, releases a non-verbal energy above their surface." —Steve McCaffery, "Bill Bissett: A Writing Outside Writing." "spellings changing as nuance implikaysyuns shift altr retain its theyr xpressiv being yes langwage also not statik diffrent spellings reflekting elusidating different ranges ovr time it being plural parts uv itselvs resonate mor enchance partik ularize mor aspekts uv the shiftings uv kours creating manee aspekting awarenesses espeshulee uv thos realms wch ar not offishulee in th statements thru th spelling behaving mor n mor phoentikalee we can see demonstraysyuns uv how peopul oftn dont reelee meen what they ar saying n sew on inklude othr radikalee diffrent opsyuns sum evn kontra dicktoree 2 or with th surface meenings sew that th voisings radiate n within spreding in2 a largr hemispheer..." —bill bissett, from an interview with Adeena Karasick. Printed letterpress then handpainted and signed by bill bissett. Bound in cloth over boards. $4000.

William Blake, Barbara Fahrner and Philip Gallo, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell: A Reading and Study. New York. Granary Books. 1993. 12 1/2" x 12"; Letterpress, drawings. 41 copies. 11 hors commerce, 30 for sale. An affinity with Blake's sense of the integrity of the artist's vision and self-created world has long been a salient characteristic of Barbara Fahrner's work. In this book, typography reflects the stylistic eccentricities of Blake's poem while Fahrner's drawings respond to its powerful statement. Typography and printing by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. Bound by Daniel Kelm and staff at the Wide Awake Garage. Housed in a cloth box by Jill Jevne. ISBN: 1-887123-03-2. $4,500.

Jane Brakhage, From the Book of Legends. New York. Granary Books. 1990. 8 1/4" x 5 3/4"; Letterpress. 180 copies. 80 in boards, 100 in wrappers. Designed and printed by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. Recollections of Maya Deren, Joseph Cornell and Charles Olson told in the style of Mallory. (Out-of-print).


Joe Brainard, I Remember. 2001. Our reprint of this classic is issued in conjunction with the traveling exhibition "Joe Brainard: A Retrospective." In 1970, Angel Hair Books published the first edition of I Remember—700 copies that quickly sold out. Brainard wrote two subsequent volumes for Angel Hair, More I Remember (1972) and More I Remember More (1973), both of which proved as popular as the original. In 1973, the Museum of Modern Art published Brainard's I Remember Christmas, a new text for which he also contributed a cover design and four drawings. Excerpts from the Angel Hair editions appeared in Interview, Gay Sunshine, The World, and The New York Herald. In 1975, Full Court Press jumped at the chance to issue a revised version, which collected all three of the Angel Hair volumes and added new material, using the original title I Remember. The most recent edition was published by Viking Penguin in 1994.
ISBN: Paper: 1-887123-48-2. $12.

Joe Brainard & John Ashbery, The Vermont Notebook. (see John Ashbery) Betty Bright, No Longer Innocent: Book Art in America, 1960 to 1980, September 1, 2005. 7" x 10", 350 pp. No Longer Innocent: Book Art in America:1960–1980 is the first history to trace the emergence of the artist's book in the U.S. during the 1960s and 1970s. This history takes a inclusive view of the varied field of book art and redresses the sporadic or confused acknowledgment from the art world that has long marginalized the artist's book. The book identifies European precursors of these kinds of artists' books, then quickly moves to America with the development of artists and books and non-profit organization. No Longer Innocent also addresses the ways book art affected and responded to art movements, such as Pop, Fluxus or Conceptualism. The book's inclusive approach suggests that it will appeal to a broad audience, from collectors of fine press books and deluxe books, to artists making multiple and sculptural bookworks, to cultural historians, librarians and booklovers interested in the phenomenon of the persistence of the book metaphor. Teachers in higher education with a broad view of the field's beginnings will find this book useful for classes in American studies and art history, as well as studio arts classes in printmaking, photography and sculpture. ISBN:1-887123-71-7, $39.95 (U.S.).

Betty Bright, No Longer Innocent: Book Art in America, 1960 to 1980, September 1, 2005. 7" x 10", 350 pp. No Longer Innocent: Book Art in America:1960–1980 is the first history to trace the emergence of the artist's book in the U.S. during the 1960s and 1970s. This history takes a inclusive view of the varied field of book art and redresses the sporadic or confused acknowledgment from the art world that has long marginalized the artist's book. The book identifies European precursors of these kinds of artists' books, then quickly moves to America with the development of artists and books and non-profit organization. No Longer Innocent also addresses the ways book art affected and responded to art movements, such as Pop, Fluxus or Conceptualism. The book's inclusive approach suggests that it will appeal to a broad audience, from collectors of fine press books and deluxe books, to artists making multiple and sculptural bookworks, to cultural historians, librarians and booklovers interested in the phenomenon of the persistence of the book metaphor. Teachers in higher education with a broad view of the field's beginnings will find this book useful for classes in American studies and art history, as well as studio arts classes in printmaking, photography and sculpture. ISBN:1-887123-71-7, $39.95 (U.S.).

C

John Cage, Barbara Fahrner and Philip Gallo, Nods. New York. Granary Books. 1991. 13 1/4" x 6 3/4"; Original drawings and letterpress. 45 copies. 10 hors commerce; 35 for sale. Barbara Fahrner performed a selection from and chance operations on several of Cage's texts in order to produce what became the text of Nods. Fahrner's original drawings are of pen, ink and guache. Visually innovative typography and letterpress printing by Philip Gallo at the Hermetic Press. Bindings by Daniel Kelm at the Wide Awake Garage. (Out-of-print).

Ken Campbell, Steven Clay and Susan King, Execution: The Book. 1990. 15" x 5 1/4"; An elaborate and unusual catalog for an exhibition of English artist Ken Campbell's bookworks at Granary Books in NYC. Campbell designed and printed the catalog himself in four colors, via letterpress. Brief essays by Steven Clay and Susan King; checklist of the exhibition, his first in the U.S.A., a useful document, all signed by the artist. $75.

Paul Celan & Barbara Fahrner, translated by Pierre Joris. Four Poems. New York. Granary Books. 1999. 7 1/4" X 9" Four poems newly translated by Pierre Joris with etchings (and original handwork) by Barbara Fahrner. Each of the four poems is presented in English and German in its own accordian-fold booklet; the four volumes (each measuring 3 1/4" X 8") together are housed in a cloth covered box. Twenty copies were produced for the U. S. and twenty for Germany. (Out-of-print).

Emilie Clark and Lyn Hejinian,
The Lake.. (see Lyn Hejinian).

Emilie Clark and Lyn Hejinian, The Traveler and the Hill, and the Hill. (see Lyn Hejinian).

Steven Clay, editor, When will the book be done? Granary's Books. 2001. 8" x 8"; 210 pages. For over fifteen years, Granary Books has brought together bookmakers, writers and artists to explore verbal/visual relations in the time honored spirit of independent publishing. With a foreword by Charles Bernstein and an introduction by publisher Steven Clay, When will the book be done? features complete lists and descriptions of nearly 100 artists' books, writer/artist collaborations and books of theory pertaining to books, writing and publishing. Each book is annotated with quotes from the artists and writers, critical notes, bibliographic information and full color illustrations. "At Granary, books are not neutral containers but are invested with a life of their own, conceived as objects first and foremost, entering the world not as the discardable shell of some other story but piping their own tunes on their own instruments....curiously, this particular book, this book of books, provides something that no one of the books depicted possibly can. For the images and texts ... make a picture not just of discreet works but also of something that cannot be contained by a book, a publisher: a publisher's aesthetic, a publisher's production." —Charles Bernstein, from the foreword. ISBN: Paper: 1-887123-43-1. $40.00


Steven Clay and Rodney Phillips, A Secret Location on the Lower East Side: Adventures in Writing, 1960-1980: A Sourcebook of Information. New York. Granary Books and the New York Public Library. 1998. 9" x 7"; Pre-Face by Jerome Rothenberg. This book documents and expands upon the acclaimed exhibit (with 2/3 of the same title) at the New York Public Library January-July, 1998. Over 80 presses and magazines at the confluence of the New American Poetry and the Small Press Revolution are described, frequently in the words of the editor(s) involved. Checklists are also provided. Among those included are: J, Open Space, White Rabbit, Oyez, Yugen, Floating Bear, Measure, Semina, Beatitude, Black Mountain Review, Origin, Poems from the Floating World, Some/thing, Maps, Matter, Set, Something Else Press, Duende, Wild Dog, Umbra, Hambone, White Dove Review,C, Fuck You, Living Hand, Angel Hair, Big Sky, The World, Z, United Artists, Center, 0 to 9, Lines, Adventures in Poetry, Siamese Banana, Dodgems, Vehicle, Telephone, Mag City, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, Joglars, This, Tottel's, Hills, The Figures, Roof, Sun & Moon and Tuumba. The book runs to 340 pages and is illustrated with over 200 black and white photographs. Another 500 presses and magazines are cataloged in an appendix; there's also an extensive index, a 50 page introduction by Clay and Phillips and a gate-fold pull-out literary chronology of the 1950-1980 period. ISBN: 1-887123-20-2 (paper) $27.95; 1-887123-19-9 (cloth with dust jacket) $44.95.

Steven Clay and Jerome Rothenberg , editors, A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections about the Book & Writing. (see Jerome Rothenberg).

Norma Cole, Collective Memory, Poetry Center & Granary Books, 2006. 9" x 11", 52 pp. Collective Memory originated in the context of the installation work by that name, created by Norma Cole at the California Historical Society in San Francisco. The text comprises several sections: "Prelude" is followed by "Speech Production: Themes and Variations" which is illustrated throughout with full-color photographs, by Norma Cole, presented here in the form of one inch sections resembling 35 mm contact sheet strips. This section is followed by "Collective Memory: History" which is illustrated with Cole’s line drawings and provides insight into the poet’s process of developing the installation. Another section of text (9 x 1 3/4 inches), "House of Hope" in memoriam Montien Boonma 1953-2000 is separately bound into the covers at the bottom of the book in such a way that it runs parallel to the above noted text. "House of Hope" is composed 416 quotations "notebook phrases" from a wide range of artists, poets, filmmakers, philosophers, and other writers. It references and re-produces Cole’s hanging sculpture of the same name, transformed into a new presentation for this book. Collective Memory is co-published by Granary Books, New York City and the Poetry Center, San Francisco State University. The book is designed by Emily McVarish and bound in buckram over boards by Coriander Reisbord. The letterpress portion is set in Bulmer and printed on Somerset Book by Philip Gallo at the Hermetic Press. Offset portions are set in Universe and printed on Mohawk Superfine and French Paper Company Construction. The edition comprises 48 copies of which 12 are hors commerce and 36 are for sale. $1,500.

Clark Coolidge and Keith Waldrop, Bomb. New York. Granary Books. 2000. 10" x 8", 48 pages, 1-887123-32-6, paperback. Bomb is a meditation on a book of photographs that document the Manhattan Project, Los Alamos. The thirty-page poem begins with epigraphs by Democritus, Gregory Corso and AndrÈ Breton/Paul Eluard before embarking upon its own project of lucid investigation via an elliptical glancing narration: "Put the bomb in a glass vase/add dust and forget." Bomb is sharp, stark, rhythmic; Mr. Coolidge tangles with the dreamlike oddness of the photographs in fits and starts of language with an explosive beauty. Keith Waldrop's series of collages are literal reworkings of the original pictures: deep blacks and bright whites excavated from the book, remade here in the image of the poem. Printed offset, two-color cover, perfect binding. 1-887123-32-6, Paperback, $12.00.

William Corbett, Michael Gizzi and Joseph Torra, editors, The Blind See Only This World: Poems for John Weiners. New York, Granary Books and Boston, Pressed Wafer. 2000. 7 1/2" x 5", 112 pages, paperback. "The Blind See Only This World honors the work of the poet John Wieners. It takes its title from the last poem in his sequence Pressed Wafer. In the biographical note Wieners wrote for Donald Allen's anthology The New American Poetry he remembered, "I first met Charles Olson on the night of Hurricane Hazel, September 11, 1954, when I 'accidentally' heard him read his verse at the Charles St. Meeting House (Boston). They passed out complimentary copies of the Black Mountain Review #1, and I ain't been able to forget." Many of those in this volume, whether they encountered Wieners first in his Hotel Wentley Poems (1959) or twenty-five years later in the two volumes of selected Wieners Raymond Foye edited for Black Sparrow Press, can say that they too ain't been able to forget. Wieners has lived for the past thirty years in Joy Street on Boston's Beacon Hill." (William Corbett). Contributors to the anthology are: John Ashbery, Paul Auster, Amiri Baraka, Ed Barrett, Jim Behrle, Dodie Bellamy, Bill Berkson, Daniel Bouchard, John Clarke, Clark Coolidge, William Corbett, Robert Creeley, Tim Davis, Diane di Prima, Edward Dorn, Robert Duncan, Jim Dunn, Kenward Elmslie, Elaine Equi, Larry Fagin, Michael Franco, Benjamin Friedlander, Michael Friedman, Merrill Gilfillan, Allen Ginsberg, Michael Gizzi, Peter Gizzi, Robert Gl¸ck, John Godfrey, Barbara Guest, Thom Gunn, Jim Harrison, Lee Harwood, Stratis Haviaris, Fanny Howe, Susan Howe, Kenneth Irby, Stephen Jonas, Robert Kelly, Kevin Killian, Ann Kim, August Kleinzahler, Joanne Kyger, Gerritt Lansing, Frank Lima, Nathaniel Mackey, Bernadette Mayer, Gail Mazur, Duncan McNaughton, Askold Melnyczuk, Charles North, Jawn P, Ron Padgett, Michael Palmer, Jack Powers, Michael Rumaker, Andrew Schelling, Charley Shively, Aaron Shurin, Cedar Sigo, Charles Simic, James Tate, Joseph Torra, Paul Violi, Anne Waldman, Lewis Warsh, Carol Weston, Dara Wier, Elizabeth Willis, John Yau, Geoffrey Young and John Wieners. 1-887123-34-2, Paperback, $12.00.

Robert Creeley & Archie Rand, Drawn & Quartered. 2001. 7" x 5 1/2 " 116 pages, edition of 2000. "It was John Yau who had introduced us some years ago in New York. Archie [Rand]'s humor, quickness, and lack of pretension much attracted me, but the chance to work with him was curiously hard to come by despite his own play with narrative texts and old-time comic book formats. Then Archie sent me a cluster of xeroxes of drawings he'd been doing and suggested I might do some text or texts to go with them. It was an instantly attractive proposal, but, again, it wasn't until Archie actually came with his wife Maria to Buffalo—he was to check a 40-by-60-foot wall at the Castellani Museum in Niagara University, so as to do something with me for a show of my collaborations—that anything really happened. How it did still amazes me. I knew Archie had brought with him the litho sheets with the fifty-four drawings. I had tried a few brief quatrains to see how that form might work in context with the xeroxed images he'd sent me earlier. But when we went into a back room at the museum, and Archie took out the lithosheets and asked if I might try to do a text for each image there and then, I was intimidated, not to say, shocked. Still I said I'd try, and so we set out. The procedure was for Archie to slide me an image on the litho paper. I'd try a take or two to get the feel, writing on a usual sheet of typing paper, then resolve on a particular quatrain, put it with the litho sheet related—and on to the next. So we worked through the afternoon until, finally, all fifty-four poems were finished. Then I copied each poem under its respective image on the litho sheet. I recall we pretty much closed up the place—as 'twere in dream! I felt as if I had been in some fantastic traffic of narratives, all the echoes and presences and situations—like very real life indeed. I loved the almost baroque feel of the drawings, the echo of old-time illustrations and children's books. Whatever, Archie's sure got me. The rest you can judge for yourself." —Robert Creeley. Printed offset. Bound in paper wrappers. Twenty-six copies are lettered and signed by Robert Creeley and Archie Rand. ISBN: Paper: 1-887123-45-8. $15.95.

Robert Creeley and Elsa Dorfman, En Famille. New York. Granary Books. 1999. 8 1/4" X 6 1/4"; 80 pp; 22 color images. Hardback original. "Robert Creeley and Elsa Dorfman bring us the real news of the different ways the word 'family' has been made to leap beyond its lexical meanings.  Poet and photographer register how family is being re-envisioned by those who live as individuals within a 'securing center.'   Beginning with, and subverting, 'I wandered lonely as a cloud,'  William Wordsworth's quintessential Romantic image of the self,  Creeley writes a poem whose formal structure, its interlocking, echoing pattern of rhymed quatrains challenges our assumptions about the legacy of Romantic and Modernist poetry.  It is not that their legacy or the family should endure in some rigid manner; it's that they have changed and are changing still." -- John Yau, poet & critic, author of  "Active Participant: Robert Creeley and the Visual Arts." A trade edition is scheduled for September, 1999. ISBN: 1-887123-26-1. $19.95.

Robert Creeley and Alex Katz, Ligeia: A Libretto. New York. Granary Books. 1996. 13 1/4" x 6 1/2"; Letterpress. 135 copies. 35 hors commerce, 100 for sale. Originally published in 1838, Edgar Allan Poe's engaging short story Ligeia „invites a diversity of readings and one feels confidence in making a determination for one's own necessary uses¾ (Robert Creeley). Here, the material has been translated into an operatic context, Mr. Creeley's first libretto. He excerpts from Poe's narrative in brief:œthe narrator/hero meets the exceptional Ligeia, is captivated by her, marries her, and becomes entirely influenced by her commanding powers of intellect and beauty. Then she dies harshly, resistingly. And then, after a brief time, the hero remarries, and the cycle is almost immediately repeated by without seeming resistance, which leads to the intense conclusion, the recreation of Ligeia in the corpse of the Lady Rowena. (from „A Note on Ligeia¾ by Mr. Creeley.) Ligeia: A Libretto makes use of the emphasized pattern of Poe's narrative. His vocabulary, rhythms and rhetorical emphasis also inform Mr. Creeley's compositional strategy. Ultimately, however, one is left with a new and unique work here beautifully transformed for the stage. Alex Katz has made the set design drawing for staging and costume toward the eventual production of Ligeia. Designed and printed by Philip Gallo. Bound by Jill Jevne. Signed by Mr. Creeley and Mr. Katz. ISBN: 1-887123-11-3. $500.

Simon Cutts
, A Smell of Printing: Poems 1988-1998. 2000. 7" x 51/2", 96 pages, Edition of 500. Simon Cutts, writer, artist, designer and founder of Coracle Press and Gallery, offers a generous helping of recent writing in this collection of poems, 1988-1998. Within the pages one finds "addendum erratum," a bookmark with a poem (loose within), as well as "an ode for the recovery of an olympia 66 typewriter" and "The Rubber Stamp Mini Printer Series 1." Mr. Cutts's approach to the tradition of printing, a subject and field that this book shows has played a significant part in his life, is both serious and personal while maintaining a playful attitude. His language is spare and vivid, often illuminating small details within a simple line and quickly presenting an idea or moment. The poems within these pages offer a glimpse into a life that admires a printing press as much as the natural world and a page with words as much as the personal world. "Every once in awhile Simon Cutts makes a pure and simple poem (nothing is pure and nothing is ever simple, so what?)ãa work I have been waiting for all my life to see." Jonathan Williams, "A Particularly non-arty Response to the Coracle Man" Co-published with Coracle Press. Designed by Amber Phillips. Printed offset. Notchbound in paper wrappers with dustjacket. 1-887123-36-9. $15.

D

Fielding Dawson, Basil King: Paintings From the Cards. Exhibition pamphlet. (Out-of-print).

Tennessee Rice Dixon, Scrutiny in the Great Round. New York. Granary Books. 1992. 11" x 8"; Copier, collage, painting, drawing. 22 copies plus one prototype; 4 and the prototype hors commerce, 17 for sale. Rooted in biology and informed by prophecy, this book traces an alchemical lifeline in time: from before conception to after birth. A range of evolutionary characteristics, from sacred to profane, are here evoked through a visual narrative of intense investigation, potent with beauty. A host of images, from seventeenth-century alchemical engravings to twentieth-century high school science book illustrations, editioned on the copies, provide the background for Ms. Dixon's original collage, drawing and painting. Hinting at autobiography, Scrutiny in the Great Round is concerned with the imagery of fertility, reproduction, birth, and growth. The paper has a delicate densely worked surface with photomontages, drawings and paintings. Bound by Daniel E. Kelm and staff at The Wide Awake Garage. Drop-back boxes made by Jill Jevne. (Out-of-print).


Toni Dove, Mesmer: Secrets of the Human Frame. New York. Granary Books. 1993. 11" x 8"; 64 pages; 60 copies. 10 hors commerce, 50 for sale. (Note: 6 extra copies were bound: 1 binder's copy in full metal and others in screen and cellophane for the Borowsky Center.) „Toni Dove's Mesmer, after having undergone several metamorphoses (computer-driven slide and sound installation, radiophonic work, essay), has most recently been recreated as an artist's book. This work, which refers to itself as åa fractured icon, an unstable portrait,' is both a study of the construction of female identity and an elegy to the intersecting nineteenth-century origins of psychoanalysis, cinema and industrial technologiesœThrough a dialogical collage-montage in the voices of Freud, Dora, Echo and a Cyborg AngelœMesmer is a mediatic robotic machine that investigates how the soul is nothing but corporeal facade and speech act.¾ (Allen S. Weiss, Art + Text). Printed offset in several shades of metallic ink by Lori Spencer at the Borowsky Center for Publication Arts in Philadelphia. It uses both transparent and opaque papers, and includes a three-dimensional centerfold popup; it has many layers and is densely visual. Bound in metal by Daniel E. Kelm and staff at the Wide Awake Garage. Slipcases made by Jill Jevne. (Out-of-print).

Henrik Drescher, Too Much Bliss. New York. Granary Books. 1992. 12" x 9"; 46 pages; Letterpress on Rives BFK with extensive collage, drawing, cutting and painting, and latex. 41 copies. 16 hors commerce; 25 for sale. „I've been circling this book like a suspicious cat for the past month, not daring to form an opinion about an object that is so much an extension of the artist that only his physical presence is missing. Henrik Drescherœhas poured his guts into Too Much Bliss. There they are, in the form of contorted creatures, floating body parts, exploded decoration, splattered watercolor, collage, cryptic messages written in an elegantly clumsy hand, sheets of latex, and åornamentalities' by his wife Lauren. Drescher describes all this as åscars, tattoos, cracks, memories, impressions, flashbacks, forgotten instructions,' or as is written on the last page, åeverything at once.'¾ (Barbara Tetenbaum, Bookways.) In the words of Johanna Drucker „this book has the look of some manic, encyclopedic new age Sears and Roebuck mail order catalogue of all the elements that ever existed in the course of organic history and human memory.¾ Letterpress on Rives BFK with extensive collage, drawing, cutting and painting, and latex. Printed by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. Bound by Daniel E. Kelm and staff at the Wide Awake Garage. Boxes by Jill Jevne. ISBN: 1-887123-05-9. (Out-of-print).

Johanna Drucker,The Century of Artists' Books, 2nd Edition, 2004.9 1/4" x 6 1/4", 392 pp., 200 B & W photographs. With a new preface by the author and an introduction by The New York Times senior art critic Holland Cotter. New cover design by Emily McVarish. A folded fan, a set of blocks, words embedded in lucite: artists' books are a singular form of imaginative expression. With the insight of the artist and the discernment of the art historian, Drucker details over 200 of these works, relating them to the variety of art movements of the last century and tracing their development in form and concept. This work, one of the first full-length studies available of artists' books, provides both a critical analysis of the structures themselves and a basis for further reflection on the philosophical and conceptual roles they play. From codex to document, from performance to self-image, the world of artists' books is made available to student and teacher, collector and connoisseur. A useful work for all art collections, both public and academic. —Paula Frosch, Metropolitan Museum of Art Library in New York. ISBN 1-887123-02-04 (paper), $29.95.

Johanna Drucker, The Century of Artists' Books. New York. Granary Books. 1995. 9 1/4" x 6 1/4"; 377 pages. The clothbound edition was issued in 1995; the paperback in 1997. The first full-length study of the development of artists' books as a twentieth century artform. This book situates artists' books within the context of mainstream developments in the visual arts and is designed to raise critical and theoretical issues as well as provide a historical overview. Drucker explores more than two hundred individual books in relation to their structure, form, and conceptualization. Hardback edition: ISBN: 1-887123-01-6. (Out-of-print) a few copies are available for $75. Paperback edition: ISBN 1-887123-02-4. (Out-of-print).


Johanna Drucker, Figuring the Word: Essays on Books, Writing and Visual Poetics. New York. Granary Books. 1998. 11" x 8 1/2"; Introduction by Charles Bernstein. Paperback original. This book is a sort of Johanna Drucker reader -- yet rather than anthologize from published books, Figuring the Word collects writings published in obscure academic and literary journals or delivered as talks or interviews. The book contains several sections (each with several chapters) including "Writing as Artifact," "Visual Poetics," "Artists' Books Past and Future," "The Future of Writing," and "Personal Writing." Figuring the Word is a work of poetics rather than criticism or theory in that these essays are the products of doing as much as thinking, of printing as much as writing, of designing as much as researching, of typography as much as composition, of autobiography as much as theory. The mark of the practitioner-critic is everywhere present in these pieces: Figuring the Word is a wide-ranging collection of Drucker's essays from the early-80s to the present. Written in a variety of styles and presented in a variety of formats, the book reflects many divergent aspects of her work and thinking, while at the same time demonstrating how cohesive her project has been." --  from the introduction by Charles Bernstein, Poet, Editor and David Gray Professor of Poetry and Poetics at SUNY/ Buffalo. ISBN: 1-887123-23-7. $24.95.


Johanna Drucker, The History of the/my Wor(l)d. New York. Granary Books. 1995. 11 1/4" x 8 1/2"; 40 pages; Offset in two colors, with a letterpress dust jacket. A striking alternative to the familiar telling of historical events. A richly suggestive work interweaving official history and individual memory, mythic and major moments in the course of western civilization. Printed at SoHo Services by Michael Chan under the eye of Anne Noonan and staff. Hardback with dust jackets printed letterpress, in several colors, by the author. This edition is based upon the Druckwork original letterpress edition (1990). ISBN: 1-887123-06-7. $75.


Johanna Drucker, Narratology. New York. Druckwerk. 1994. 12 1/4" x 10 1/4"; This book is about the relation between tropes of genre fiction as models for women's lives and the lived experience of Drucker's own life - synthesized and at times counterposted in this text. "The stories according to which the possiblities of living a life gained access to the psychic theater staging the events as real." Letterpress and hand-coloring. 70 copies. Written, designed, printed, hand-colored and bound by Johanna Drucker. Handbound in die-stamped covers. ISBN: 1-887123-00-8. $950.

Johanna Drucker, Night Crawlers on the Web. 2000. 4 1/4" x 5 1/2"; 26 pages. Johanna Drucker is well known for her remarkable artists books which treat text as image and construct elaborate narratives replete with scholarly reference and autobiography. Night Crawlers on the Web evokes another of Ms. Drucker's passions, the Victorian novel. Here she paints a somewhat Gothic landscape peopled with hi-tech, lo-cal humanoids who speak in a language built largely around the ubiquity of consumer computers. Words like "mode" "display" "browser" "pixel" proliferate as our protagonist wills an intangible cyber lover into existence. Somewhat reminescent of William Burroughs, this is a humorous and imaginative romp through the looking glass which seems to mediate a great many of our daily lives. Ms. Drucker has illustrated this small volume with whimsical drawings; the work "was written in the late winter of 1999-2000 in Charlottesville, inspired by my new friends and colleagues at the Univerisity of Virginia...." ISBN: 1-887123-42-3. $12.

Johanna Drucker, The Word Made Flesh. New York. Granary Books. 1996. 8 1/2" x 12 1/4"; Offset with a letterpress dust jacket. 500 copies. Calling attention to the visual materiality of the text, this book attempts to halt linear reading, trapping the eye in a field of letters which make a complex object on the page. The work both embodies and discusses language as a physical form. This is a facsimile edition of the Druckwerk original letterpress edition (1989). Covers handprinted by Johanna Drucker. Bound by Jill Jevne. ISBN: 1-887123-09-1. $100.

Johanna Drucker and Susan Bee, A Girl's Life. June 2002. 7"x 10" 48 pp. A collaborative graphic melodrama of romance, crime and passion, A Girl's Life addresses adolescent angst in all of its fashionably gory details. The snares and pitfalls of contemporary life, which all girls must struggle with to survive, are here revealed through darkly comic and fiendishly noir prose, accompanied by lurid collage and wildly adventurous typography. ISBN 1-887123-56-3. PB. $24.95

E

Joe Elliot and Julie Harrison, If It Rained Here. (see Julie Harrison).


Kenward Elmslie, Nite Soil. New York. Granary Books. 2000. 5" x 7"; 41 full-color postcards in an envelope.
Kenward Elmslie's way with words cuts a singular swath through a polymath variety of forms. Jukebox hitlet sung by Nat King Cole. Ahead-of-their-time lingo works: The Champ, poem, City Junket, play. Balloons for cartoons by Joe Brainard. Pureed anthropological tales of fantasy drinking establishments: 26 Bars. Quirky surreal poetry mosaics (Routine Disruptions) that prompted Michael Silverblatt, host of NPR's "Book Worm," to finger Kenward as "Hands down, my favorite contemporary poet." Elmslie's verbal swath includes The Grass Harp (Broadway cult-fave musical) and, annum 2000, Postcards on Parade, composed by Steven Taylor, a concept musical that deconstructs musicals. Plus Cyberspace, tech poem enhanced by Trevor Winkfield visuals. The wrap: Nite Soil introduces Kenward, poet of dense stanzas, to Elmslie, outed collagist of resonant icons. 1-887123-39-3, $27.50. Also available in a limited edition of 26 copies lettered and signed by the author and including a unique handmade collage by Mr. Elmslie ($250).

Kenward Elmslie and Trevor Winkfield, Cyberspace. New York. Granary Books. 2000. 9 1/2" x 8 1/2", 48 pages, paperback with dust jacket. Cyberspace was created in a millennial visionary frenzy by two confirmed Luddites on the cusp of Y2K. Time keeps the world from happening all at once yet in Cyberspace we are yanked into the rabbit-hole and steam-rollered by a strange-yet-familiar cosmos of simultaneity: absurd, serious, musical, noisy, cartoony, colorful, witty, satirical, theatrical and deep. Mr. Winkfield's mid-maelstrom collages are illuminated by the torch of Mr. Elmslie's brilliant (if near pathological) reinvention of the English language. Together they ask, and possibly answer, the question: "…why reinvent the wheel online via an all-pixel dream?" Cyberspace grounds us in an abundance of everything while it recreates our world in a daring act of imagination.1-887123-33-4, $19.95.
Also available as a limited edition of 26 copies lettered and signed by author and artist, $75.

Timothy C. Ely and Terence McKenna, Synesthesia. New York. Granary Books. 1992. 9 1/2" x 7"; 40 pages; edition of 75. Letterpress, painting, drawing. 75 copies. 20 hors commerce; 55 for sale. Timothy C. Ely's original drawings and painted images are Òarticulated glossolalia retraced from a text by Terence McKenna"-- a collaboration resulting in mysterious glyphs, maps, and visionary, mystical musings. Typography and printing by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. Bound by Daniel E. Kelm and staff at The Wide Awake Garage. Housed in a box. $2,500.

Ed Epping, Abstract Refuse: A Heteronymic Primer. New York. Granary Books. 1995. 13" x 8"; 34 pages; Designed on a Mac, printed with a Hewlett Packard 1200 C/PS on Rives Heavyweight Buff. 200 copies. Abstract Refuse presents a collection of English language words identified as heteronyms: two or more words with the same spelling, different pronunciation, different meaning. The dual and sometimes triplicate existence of these words is combined with images to examine a structure for the mechanics of remembering and forgetting. The clear and dense qualities of memory are constructed around the conditions formed by the single and paired heteronyms on every page. The book is structured to examine six stations of constituent and cultural memory: isolating the subject on a selected field; the mapped relations between remembered subjects; the mnemonic systems of cataloging and storage; the static interference of memories in conflict; the ground that re-members the dis-jointed forms; and the final station, recall. There are four conductors within each station who control the passages between analysis, intimacy, dream and ancestry. The book is designed and printed by Ed Epping. The type and imagery were designed on a Power Macintosh 7100/66, using Aldus Freehand 4.0 and Adobe Photoshop 2.5, and printed with a Hewlett Packard 1200 C/PS on Rives Heavyweight Buff. The book was bound in wrappers by Jill Jevne. (Out-of-print).

Ed Epping, Secreted Contract. New York. Granary Books. 1998. 11" x 6 1/2"; Further work on the heteronyms. Images are combined with words whose context offers a dual, and sometimes triplicate existence. 60 copies. Designed and printed by Ed Epping. Printed on the Hewlett Packard ink-jet printer. Bound by Jill Jevne. Wrappers. $250.

Ed Epping (images) and Edmond Jabès (translated by Rosmarie Waldrop), Desire for a Beginning Dread of One Single End (see Edmond Jabès)

Ed Epping and Kimberly Lyons, Mettle. New York. Granary Books. 1996. 12" x 6 3/4"; Printed on the Hewlett Packard ink-jet printer. 150 copies. 30 hors commerce, 120 for sale. Mettle is long, thirty six part poem by Kimberly Lyons with images by Ed Epping. Mr. Epping, who has written on the problem of books with formats disconnected from their content, designed and printed the book with electronic media. The non-tactile nature of digital printing seems contrary to, but works quite well with, the book's pages of heavy paper, bound in stiff end papers and raw boards. The poem appears to be printed in a shade less than 100 percent, causing the letters to sit both in and on the page. Mr. Epping's images of the body, bones, and heteronyms like „subject/object¾ are similarly immagerial and collage-like, mingling harmoniously with Ms. Lyons's texts: „to the unaided eye/ depression is a melange/ of incongruous elements/ black andradite garnet, pale yellow,/ the world becomes a giant/ enveloping substance/ ray in the stele/ tongue¾ The type and images were created primarily on the Mac. Designed and printed by Ed Epping. Bound in quarter black cloth and raw Davey board by Jill Jevne. Very provocative writing from the author of Abracadabra (Granary 2000). Printed on the Hewlett Packard Inkjet printer. Hardback original with glassine jacket. ISBN: 1-887123-10-5. (Out-of-print).

F


Larry Fagin and Trevor Winkfield, Dig and Delve. New York. Granary Books. 1999. Vivid and colorful visual images by Winkfield and new writings by Fagin. If this is the century of artists' books then Dig & Delve is a perfect final act as it embraces the contradictions that characterize the beginnings and endings of the nineteen hundreds. Dig & Delve is a postmodern illustrated book; it tropes on the genre of the much maligned livre d'artiste, playfully dancing on the tightrope between pre-Raphaelite sensibility and radical artifice. Ultimately a happy work, Dig & Delve is optimistic, antediluvian and generous; a perfect passport to the next millennium. Mr. Winkfield's color images and Mr. Fagin's texts have been masterfully printed by Ruth Lingen at her Pooté Press
in Chelsea. Judith Ivry's expert bindings were constructed in the East Village. 18 pp; bound in printed cloth over boards. Sixty-seven copies in the edition, of which 50 are for sale. $2500.

Barbara Fahrner & Paul Celan, translated by Pierre Joris, Four Poems. (see Paul Celan).


Barbara Fahrner, William Blake and Philip Gallo, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell: A Reading and Study. (see William Blake).

Barbara Fahrner, John Cage and Philip Gallo, Nods. (see John Cage).

Barbara Fahrner and Kurt Schwitters, A Flower Like A Raven. (see Kurt Schwitters).


Aaron Fischer (Ted Berrigan), Ted Berrigan: An Annotated Checklist. (see Ted Berrigan).


Ed Friedman and Robert Kushner, Away. 2000. 54 pages, edition of 50. "Something about the descriptive and imagistic nature of Away made me think of the artist/poet books designed by LÈger, Matisse, Kandinsky and others... . Steve [Clay] and I discussed some of the artists with whom I'd previously collaborated. We agreed to approach Robert Kushner as a collaborator. Though Bob and I had collaborated a lot during the 1970s and early 1980s, we hadn't in awhile, and I thought it would be great to work together again. "Bob read Away a lot. Fairly early on, he decided that it didn't make sense to illustrate the text. He kept telling me that he liked how 'slippery' the writing was. I think what he meant was that individual pieces have the feeling of narrative—a center or location with points of interest—but the specifics shift around and fly off in many different directions. Illustration, even if possible, would tend to lock down meanings that were better left transient. "What Bob has done is create a number of images which correspond to some of Away's recurring imagery. Stars, water, foliage, etc. are printed around and beneath the text in varying combinations and in different colors. With the writing, the printed images create a coherent and shifting visual milieu." —Ed Friedman. Printed letterpress by Ruth Lingen at Pooté Press. Bound in cloth over boards by Judith Ivry. Signed by Ed Friedman and Robert Kushner. $2500.

Felix Furtwängler and Franz Kamin, The Man Who Was Always Standing There. (see Franz Kamin).

G

Philip Gallo (Barbara Fahrner, William Blake), The Marriage of Heaven and Hell: A Reading and Study. (see William Blake).


Philip Gallo (Barbara Fahrner, John Cage), Nods. (see John Cage).

Max Gimblett & Alan Loney, Mondrian's flowers. (see Alan Loney).

Michael Gizzi, William Corbet and Joseph Torra, editors, The Blind See Only This World: Poems for John Weiners. (see William Corbet).

Kenneth Goldsmith, Soliloquy. 2001. 8 1/4" x 5 1/2", 296 pages, edition of 1500. "If every word spoken in New York City daily were somehow to materialize as a snowflake, each day there would be a blizzard." —Kenneth Goldsmith. Soliloquy, a written record of every word spoken by artist, web designer and DJ Kenneth Goldsmith during one week, debuted as a text installation in 1997. Presenting all of one man's words in a continuous, abstract stream, the work inspired self-examination by both artist and viewers. In this book version, language is concrete as well as arranged. The collection of words is divided into seven "acts" through which the structure and sequence of Mr. Goldsmith's days becomes evident. "Confronted with the clutter of 'real' speech (not to mention its content, which might prove more embarrassing than its stammers and mumbles), we realize that we all sound a bit like George Bush. This originating concept may be simple, but the end result is a complex provocation on language and visuality, documentary, autobiography, and the elusive relation between an individual's speech and the linguistic patterns of a particular social milieu... . By choosing to cast Soliloquy as both installation and book, Goldsmith is drawing attention to the fact that reading and looking are not equivalent activities." —Gordon Tipper, zingmagazine. Printed offset. Bound in paper wrappers. ISBN 1-887123-53-9. $17.95.

Nada Gordon & Gary Sullivan, Swoon. 2001. 8" x 6"; edition of 1000. Swoon is the true story of two writers who meet and fall in love over the internet. It is autobiography, poetry, literary essay and erotica all rolled into one. Swoon documents the tenacity of love, and shows how, like a species of prehistoric insect that continues to crawl among us, it survivesãwith language as its hostãeven in inhospitable conditions. Disclosures open to further disclosures, and the correspondence morphs into ardent multiform verses, resulting in a truly dialogic exchange that renders void any distinctions between art and life. Swoon is like Heloise and Abelard without tragedy, the troubadors without inequality, and the Brownings without euphemismãall facilitated by the immediacy of cybercommunication. ISBN: Paper: 1-887123-54-7. $17.95.

Mimi Gross and Charles Bernstein, Some of These Daze, 2005. 10 1/4" x 11"; 64 pp. Beginning on September 11, 2001, Mimi Gross filled five sketchbooks with ink drawings made on the downtown streets, often working in the dark, directly at Ground Zero. Simultaneously, Charles Bernstein was also writing in response to the events of 9/11. Gross proposed a collaboration after hearing Bernstein read his new writings at the Zinc Bar in New York City on September 30, 2001. Gross and Bernstein together made a selection of images and text for the book. Some of These Daze was produced by Katherine Kuehn at Granary Books. It was printed in silkscreen in several colors by Luther Davis, at Axelle Fine Arts. Ltd., spiral bound at Print Icon and cased-in with printed cloth over boards by Judith Ivry. The edition comprises 75 signed and numbered copies of which 60 are for sale. $1500.

David Guss and Jerome Rothenberg, editors, The Book, Spiritual Instrument. (see Jerome Rothenberg).

H

Walter Hamady and Steven Clay, Boxes and Collages. 1990. 11" x 6 1/2"; Catalog of Walter Hamady's exhibition at Granary Books in NYC. Designed and printed letterpress by Walter Tisdale at the Landlocked Press. Includes a chronological checklist of the works in the show, a statement by Hamady and an essay by Steven Clay. The catalog is cleverly produced with an ingenious folding for the binding and contains color photographs of two of Mr. Hamady's boxes tucked into library check-out card sleeves. "Walter Hamady's drift into the making of pictures and boxes makes perfect sense because it spins out of, around, and finally reflects back on and informs the book work, provides a context for it, and somehow helps make it whole." (Steve Clay.) $75.

Duncan Hannah and Simon Pettet, Abundant Treasures. 2001 (see Simon Pettet).

Julie Harrison and Joe Elliot, If It Rained Here. New York. Granary Books. 1997. 8 3/4" x 10 3/4"; Images captured from video and enhanced in Photoshop, then printed on the Epson Stylus XL by the artist. Cover was printed using four color process letterpress. 40 copies. 10 hors commerce, 30 for sale. This book is the result of a year-long collaboration between visual artist Julie Harrison and poet Joe Elliot. The images originated from video produced at the Experimental Television Center. Elliot's text was excerpted from longer works and/or created in response to the images. Binding by Daniel Kelm and staff at The Wide Awake Garage. Cover printed by hand in four colors by Elliot at Soho Letterpress. $2000.

Julie Harrison and Lewis Warsh, Debtor's Prison. (see Lewis Warsh)

Ric Haynes, Rejected From Mars. New York. Granary Books. 1995. 14" x 10"; 56 pages. Linocuts printed letterpress. 30 copies. 10 hors commerce, 20 for sale. This extraordinary albeit rather frightening work has its genesis in a poem written by painter and book artist Ric Haynes. The writing and visual images have their source, in part, in the artist's day-job work in treating alcoholic schizophrenics in Boston. Murky, raw, cartoony, fierce, intense, swampy, dark, labyrinthine: this work is a sort of travelogue through a tortured but visionary psyche which ultimately resolves into a hard earned emotional stasis, though one manifestly maintained a day at a time. A massive book with linocuts printed by Philip Gallo & hand-painted by the artist. Bound and with slipcases by Jill Jevne. $3,500.

Lyn Hejinian, A Border Comedy. 2001. 10" x 7", 218 pages, edition of 1500. "Lyn Hejinian's work increasingly explores poetry's relation to knowledge... . But rather than abstract frameworks, one finds in [A Border Comedy, a serial poem in fifteen 'books'] coyotes, geese, didactic asides, horses, philosophical anecdotes, hawks, intercourse, wasps, Russian Formalist literary terms, goats, pigs, ravens, and a great deal of urinating. It is through this particularity that Hejinian invents a poetic pedagogy at home with its forgiveness to itself, poised both to topple and attain intellectual authority, happily open to its lack of totalizing system... . Situating her project more broadly within intellectual history, she writes: 'Digressing in a didactic tale will teach one to digress.' And digression, in all of its entertaining modes—the anecdote, the interpolated comment, the sudden shift of attention—is the displaced center of A Border Comedy... . One of the interesting oddnesses of the book, one that forces us to catch our breath and occasionally to huff, is that quasi-transcendental or a priori insights (often linked to continental philosophy) find their way skillfully and unpredictably into what is otherwise a radically nominalistic, context-dependent intellectual setting." —Lytle Shaw. Printed offset. Bound in paper wrappers. Twenty six copies signed by Lyn Hejinian. ISBN 1-887123-37-7. $15.95.

Lyn Hejinian and Emilie Clark, The Lake. New York. Granary Books. 2004. 8" x 8" —19 pages. The Lake is a deep collaboration wherein artist and poet risk allowing the other to tinker with their respective work. The book emerges from the confluence of Hejinian and Clark's energies — a child of both parents indeed. The images make use of watercolor, photography, collage, and pen & ink subtly mirroring the sprightly activity beneath the water's surface. The writings carve another layer into the work's topography and navigate the current of the book's expedition. The Lake is presented as an accordian book in a cloth-covered slipcase. The muted images are printed in full color; the text a reproduction of the poet's holograph. The book was printed by Silicon Gallery using the Epson 10600 in Philadelphia during the spring of 2004. The text stock is Somerset Velvet Enhanced 220; the cover is canvas. Judith Ivry made the bindings in New York City. 57 copies in the edition each signed by the poet and the artist: 1‚40 are for sale; 41‚55 are hors commerce. $1700.

Lyn Hejinian and Emilie Clark, The Traveler and the Hill, and the Hill. New York. Granary Books. 1998. 11 1/2" x 10" The Traveler and the Hill and the Hill is a collaboration between artist Emilie Clark and poet Lyn Hejinian. In the first half of the book, Clark's richly layered monoprints respond to Hejinian's aphoristic poems; in the second half, Hejinian comments on Clark. The book presents a series of fairy tales gone awry -- gone from the secure world of familiar knowledge and avuncular authority imparted to children into a hilarious, dark and dramatic space in which thinking happens in the seams between sentences. While Hejinian's poems investigate the social logic that binds short, illustrative moral narratives, Clark's monoprints invent a space for this investigation in which rich colors, widely various drawing, printing and transfer images behave almost as characters. The book comprises thirty-one images and thirty-one texts plus front and back matter. It measures 10" w x 11 1/2" h. Philip Gallo set the type and printed the text on Rives BFK; Emilie Clark made the images, unique in each copy of the edition of 61 of which 45 are for sale. Judith Ivry made the bindings and slip cases. $4,500.

Piero Heliczer, A Purchase in the White Botanica. 2001. 6" x 8." 120 pages. A Purchase in the White Botanica offers the first collected poetry of Piero Heliczer. It includes poems from his college days at Harvard as well as his published books, among which are & I Dreamt I Shot Arrows in My Amazon Bra (1959) and The First Battle of the Marne (1962), both of which were printed and published by his own press, the dead language, and The Soap Opera (Trigram, 1967). A Purchase in the White Botanica is supplemented with an extensive illustrated biographical interview with Heliczer's half-sister Marisabina Russo-Stark, conducted by Gerard Malanga, and a foreword by Anselm Hollo. Heliczer's lyrical works incorporated classical notions of poetry combined with radical breaks in structure. The pieces explore the page itself, recreating spelling and placement of words to create "sheer visual clarity" in meaning and form. Heliczer blends abstract or "atmospheric" images to create an almost religious notion of poetry and life (Heliczer chose not to separate the two). The works move easily from throughout Europe and the United States, mirroring Heliczer's own roaming nature. He was featured 20 years ago in Dennis Cooper's Little Caesar #9 in a 200 page festschrift compiled by Gerard Malanga and long out of print.ISBN: 1-887123-57-1 $15.95.

Fran Herndon and Jack Spicer
, Golem. (see Jack Spicer).

J. Hoberman,
On Jack Smith's Flaming Creatures (and other Secret-Flix of Cinemaroc). 2001. 10" x 7". 144 pages, edition of 2000. "Reviled, rioted over, and banned as pornographic—even as it was recognized as an unprecedented visionary masterpiece—Jack Smith's 1963 Flaming Creatures is the most important and influential underground movie ever released in America. J. Hoberman's monograph details the creative making and legal unmaking of this extraordinary film, a source of inspiration for artists as disparate as Andy Warhol, Federico Fellini and John Waters, as well as a scandal taken as far as the United States Supreme Court, described by its maker as 'a comedy set in a haunted movie studio.' "The story of Flaming Creatures is augmented with a dossier of personal recollections, relevant documents and remarkable, previously unpublished on-set photographs. Expanding on notes originally prepared for the 1997 Jack Smith retrospective at the American Museum of the Moving Image, the monograph includes further material on Mr. Smith's unfinished features—Normal Love and No President—and shorter film fragments, as well as on a few of his preferred Hollywood movies." —J. Hoberman. Printed offset. Bound in paper wrappers. Illustrated in color and black & white. ISBN: Paper: 1-887123-52-0 $29.95.

Susan Howe & Susan Bee, Bed Hangings. 2001. 10" x 7", 48 pages, edition of 1500. In Bed Hangings, poet Susan Howe and artist Susan Bee collaborate for the first time. This series of poems explores the themes of colonial America and its decorative arts, religion and Puritanism through a visual and verbal investigation of the metaphysics of beds, curtains and hangings. The poems and pictures play off against each other in a humorous, mystical and sometimes mischievous manner. "I am an insomniac who goes to bed in a closet. 'AWAKE, a., not sleeping; in a state of vigilance or action.' 'AWAKENING, n. A revival of religion, or more general attention to religion than usual.' Although these are Noah Webster's definitions, out of his writing speaks Calvin. For Calvin the Bible contains two kinds of knowledge—ecstatic union and law. In An American Dictionary of the English Language a curtain is a cloth hanging used in theatres to conceal the stage from the spectators, while an itinerant is someone who travels from place to place and is unsettled; particularly a preacher... . When Europe enters the space of its margin, the 'Kingdom of God in America' receives European memory into itself. In thin places bedsteads confront their own edges... . Field beds have canopies at the top resembling tents. One Sunday afternoon in the gift shop at Hartford's Wadsworth Atheneum... my attention came to rest on a pedestrian gray paperback. Bed-Hangings: A Treatise on Fabrics and Styles in the Curtaining of Beds, 1650-1850 with its drab cover illustration... struck me as vividly apropos. I wondered who tipped over the vase of flowers to the left of the bed in the painted East Chamber? Did the spilled flowers suggest a stray sense of comedy or inspired simplicity?" —Susan Howe, from the Epilogue. Printed offset. Bound in paper wrappers. Twenty-six copies are signed by Susan Howe and Susan Bee. ISBN: 1-887123-47-4. $14.95.

Renée Riese Hubert and Judd D. Hubert, The Cutting Edge of Reading: Artists' Books. New York. Granary Books. 1999. 265 pages, 10" x 7"; Hardback original. This splendid volume expands upon and extends the work initiated by Renée Riese Hubert in Surrealism and the Book(University of California Press, 1987) by focusing acute critical attention on recent and contemporary artists' books. In The Cutting Edge of Readingthe Huberts' develop a discourse which starts where discussion of the livre d'artiste leaves off. The study begins with a chapter on "Transitions" which examines the work of Pierre Alechinsky and Paolo Boni among others before developing and discussing, through close readings, such themes as: "Visual Deviants and Typographical Departures," "Various Ways of Frustrating our Reading Habits,"  "Altering Books: The Cutting Edge of Editing," "Variations on the Accordion," "The Book, The Museum, and Public Art," "Satire," "Concretions of Memory," "Narratives and Verbal Manipulations," "Metamorphosis of Childish Games," "Fashioners of Books." The Cutting Edge of Readingis a welcome addition to the growing body of serious critical work now being done on artstis' books. It stands as a useful compliment to Johanna Drucker's The Century of Artists' Books (Granary Books, 1995) and is a necessary reference tool for scholars, critics, collectors and librarians. Illustrated throughout in color and black & white. ISBN: 1-887123-21-0. $55.

I - J

Edmond Jabès (translated by Rosmarie Waldrop) with images by Ed Epping, Desire for a Beginning Dread of One Single End. 2001. 7" x 41/4", 56 pages, edition of 1000, 30 hors commerce. "All of [Edmond] Jabès's books explore the double wound of consciousness, our being set apart from the rest of creation in the glorious and murderous species of humankind, and set apart from our fellow humans as individuals... .His work explores the nature of the book and word, of man defining himself through the word against all that challenges him: death, silence, the void, the infinite—or God, our symbol for all of these." —Rosmarie Waldrop, "When Silence Speaks." Desire for a Beginning Dread of One Single End, translated by Rosmarie Waldrop, is a series of short aphoristic assertions permeated with a sense of melancholy and mortality. It is among the last substantial works of Jabès to be published in English. Ed Epping designed and treated the work with subtle digital images. "I first read The Book of Questions twenty years ago, and my life was permanently changed by it. I can no longer think about the possibilities of literature without thinking of the example of Edmond Jabès. He is one of the great spirits of our time, a torch in the darkness." —Paul Auster. Printed offset. Ca. 1958 copies bound in paper wrappers; ca. 42 copies, which include special inserts, bound in boards (of which 12 are hors commerce). ISBN: 1-887123-38-5. $15.


Pierre Joris (translator), Paul Celan & Barbara Fahrner, Four Poems. (see Paul Celan).

John Jurayj and Rodney Phillips, Five Poems/Five Paintings. (see Rodney Phillips).

K

Franz Kamin and Felix Furtwängler, The Man Who Was Always Standing There. New York. Granary Books. 1998. 13" x 9 3/4"; Printed and handpainted woodcuts. 55 bound books, 5 unbound flats in sets. „Franz Kamin is a uniquely multidimensional artist and thinker. A musical composer, poet and author of prose narratives and performance works combining several media, he playfully and seriously incorporates in much of his work concepts and procedures derived from such fields as topology and linguistics. But withal he's a deeply emotional romantic artist, much of whose work arises from his personal relationships. There's no one like him.¾ (Jackson Mac Low.) Text for The Man Who Was Always Standing There is excerpted from a longer work by Mr. Kamin, The Theory of Angels. The words are literally built into Felix Furtwúngler's woodcuts to become part of the image. The many-colored woodcuts are of a powerful, expressionistic style; they were made by Felix Furtwúngler and printed in up to seven colors by Ruth Lingen in Brooklyn. The artist also did considerable hand-painting directly onto the pages prior to printing. Case bound in printed cloth over boards by Barbara Mauriello and housed in a printed cloth covered slipcase. $3,000.

Shelagh Keeley, Notes on the Body. New York. Granary Books. 1991. 14 3/4" x 11"; Color photographic transfers with original drawings in pencil, pigment, gouache and wax. 17 copies. 1 artist's proof and 6 hors commerce, 10 for sale. „Keeley continues her very personal exploration of the body in this sumptuous book, more drawn than printed, fusing a sensuous whole from such contrasts as East and West, past and present, scientific and perceived. Most often she does this by juxtaposing Xerox transfersãshe uses a wax processãof anatomical diagrams from her collection with her own drawings of the same body parts in gouache, ink, charcoal, wax, or pigment. These drawingãin an existential palette of browns, reds, yellows, and blacksãfill each page much like her drawings on walls extend the space of framed images in her installations. åIn my installations,' she has written, åI am concerned with the recovery of space through gesture. There is an awareness of the body in my work process and my installations become a psychological extension of the body. Concerns in my work are: gesture of the body, gestures of the site, an architecture of emotion, the body and architecture.' She conveys those concerns within the space of this beautiful book.¾ (Print Collector's Newsletter.) Color photographic transfers with original drawings in pencil, pigment, gouache and wax. Bound by Daniel E. Kelm at the Wide Awake Garage. Title page and colophon printed letterpress by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. (Out-of-print).

Shelagh Keeley, A Space for Breathing. New York. Granary Books. 1992. 14 3/4" x 11"; 50 pages; edition of 22. Color photographic transfers with original drawings in pigment, gouache & wax. Shelagh Keeley's color photographic transfers and original drawings as well as diagram images are often abstract, yet sensually evoke the human body and its parts, interior spaces and architecture. Printed by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. Bound by Daniel E. Kelm at The Wide Awake Garage. Boxes by Jill Jevne. (Out-of-print).

Stefan Klima, Artists Books: A Critical Survey of the Literature. New York. Granary Books. 1998. 104 pages, 8 3/4" x 5 1/4"; Paperback original. This book contains five essays which chart the ongoing critical debates surrounding artists books -- including issues such as definition and identity, disputed origins, and current status. Carefully researched, this is the first published comprehensive bibliography of its depth and scope and thus an essential resource in a field of continuing interest to scholars, librarians, critics, collectors, and general readers. ISBN: 1-887123-18-0. $17.95.

Alison Knowles, Footnotes: 30 years collage journal. New York. Granary Books. 2000. 10" x 7"; 265 pgs, 120 color repros. „Once upon a time Jim Tenney and I went walking in the woods. We came to a clearing and there under a tree was an arrangement of toy locomotives in the middle of nowhere. Pausing we mused where they were going, were they had been?¾ ãAlison Knowles. Collage pages made from 30 years of small, red travel books are pasted up and redrawn, but in no defined order. The setting migrates from Japan to Cologne and back always to New York City. Ideas jotted down and friends overheard are a loosely woven context for these delicate pencil drawings. Twenty-six copies are bound in paper and cloth over boards and contain one of the original collages ($1,200). Paper: 1-887123-35-0. $45.00.

Alison Knowles, Time Samples, 2006. 6 1/4" x 6 1/2", 33 pp. "Taking the used silk screens apart is the place to begin. This book is to be selected leavings plus used tools of the trade, the trade of art-making." Thus begins the introduction to Time Samples. Each book contains 15 original "leavings" — 6 1/4 inch squares of archival material derived primarily from the artist’s studio — starting with a "green china silk remnant bought to act as a sun shield over the skylight" and ending with "mostly small sun-printed items like spoons and nails used to test the shade of blue possible to get, given the decay of light after its zenith at noon." In between are cut-ups, litho film, "red lentil embedments in flax," silk-screen fragments, "live body prints," "iron-on color Xeroxes of objects…" and much more. Opposite each fragment is an identifying caption as well as a section from the text "Writing Red" which is a written performance of the 1962 Fluxus event score: "Celebration Red: Celebrate every red thing." Text and material images are here plucked from the residue of a life in art. As Knowles points out in the introduction: "The irony is that fragments and leftovers, sampled by time itself, take on a new life." The work is held together and presented within an ingenious modified accordion structure, designed and produced by Katherine Kuehn, which allows Time Samples to operate as a book while also offering the possibility of being unfolded (to over 5 feet) and hung on the wall with all of the samples visible. The typography is by Anne Noonan and Steve Clay; the book was printed at Soho Letterpress. Binding by Judith Ivry. Boxes by Portfoliobox, Inc. The edition is limited to 45 copies. $2,500.

Robert Kushner & Ed Friedman. Away. (see Ed Friedman).

L

Gerrit Lansing and Ligorano/Reese, Turning Leaves of Mind. (see Ligorano/Reese).

Constance M. Lewallen with essays by John Ashbery & Carter Ratcliff, Joe Brainard: A Retrospective. 2001 10 1/2" x 8" 176 pages, 71 color and 36 black & white photos, edition of 3000. In addition to a checklist and bibliographies of work by and about Joe Brainard, this exhibition catalog includes published and unpublished writings by Mr. Brainard, interviews, letters and the essays, "Joe Brainard" by John Ashbery, "Acts of Generosity" by Constance Lewallen and "Joe Brainard's Quiet Dazzle" by Carter Ratcliff. Ms. Lewallen chronicles Joe Brainard's formative years in Oklahoma and moves to New York City and Boston, his involvement with Pop Art, assemblage and painting, and his literary and artistic associations. She writes: "His collaborations with writers [including Ted Berrigan, Kenward Elmslie and Frank O'Hara] took many forms, from comic strips to book covers and illustrations... . Not since the nineteenth century can we find such a rich joining of poetry and art." "Joe was a creature of incredible tact and generosity. He often gave his work to friends but before you could feel obliged to him he was already there, having anticipated the problem several moments or paragraphs earlier, and remedying it while somehow managing to deflect your attention from it." —John Ashbery. Designed by Julie Harrison. Illustrated in color and black & white. Printed offset. Bound in stiff wrappers with dustjacket. ISBN: Paper: 1-887123-44-x. $29.95.

Ligorano/Reese, The Corona Palimpsest. New York. Granary Books. 1996. 12 1/2" x 10"; Hand painted and letterpress, offset and collage. 40 copies. 10 hors commerce, 30 for sale. Based on the eponymous video/book installation made by the artist team Nora Ligorano and Marshall Reese. This book contains a printed collage of video stills, newspapers, art history books, and magazines, as well as handpainting using stencils and paste paper techniques. Collages printed by Joe Elliot and Anne Noonan at Soho Letterpress. Stills printed offset. Bound by Daniel Kelm at The Wide Awake Garage. (Out-of-print).

Ligorano/Reese with Gerrit Lansing, Turning Leaves of Mind. 2002. 8" x 8" Ä 80 pp. A full-color conceptual essay and artists' book based on photo documentation of Spanish bookbinding from the 13th to the 18th century. Nora Ligorano's photo research of ancient books from the major libraries and archives of Spain is subtly transformed into abstracted objects. The artists enlarge, crop, and manipulate the images to recontextualize the surface ornamentation and structural design of these early books. Marshall Reese and Gerrit Lansing's poetic text interposes the exquisite visual elements creating a meditation on the word and writing. On the Book is a testament to the book as the most elegant information storage and retrieval mechanism ever invented. ISBN 1-887123-60-1 PB, $34.95.

Paul Etienne Lincoln, The Purification of Fagus sylvatica var pendula, 2005. Granary Books and Coracle Press. 9" x 8.5" (inches), 48 pp., 50 images. The Purification of Fagus sylvatica var pendula is emblematic of Lincoln's inquiry into the origin and production of memory — and our ethereal relationship to that intangible evidence of our consciousness. In this pursuit Lincoln has employed diverse forms and themes, ranging from examination of historical figures to detailing anything from New York City infrastructure to "household" machines that dispense gin-and-tonics (mixed at varying strengths). Comprised of photographs, diagrams and text, The Purification records the series of experiments and performance which detail the afterlife of a specimen of local vegetation. The book begins, "Situated at the perimeter of Weeping Beach Tree Park in Queens, New York, was a small pavilion looking on to a stump of the oldest Weeping Beach in America. In 1847 Samuel Bowne parsons, a Quaker and a nurseryman purchased a shoot of Weeping Beach, Fagus sylvatica var pendula, in Belgium while traveling in search of unusual plants. On his return to the United States he planted the shoot at the site of the stump, then part of parson's Nurseries. Every Weeping Beech in America is descended from this one tree. Regrettably, the stump is all that remains, as shortly after this venerable tree's 150th anniversary in 1997 it died and was cut down. The tree had, however spawned seven progeny, which still grow in a circle around the original beech." Hardcover, $35.00 (U.S.).

John Locke, "Books seem to me to be pestilent things". New York. Granary Books. 1985. 6 1/4" x 10"; 100 copies. Broadside. Designed and printed by Gerald Lange at the Bieler Press. (Out-of-print).

Alan Loney & Max Gimblett, Mondrian's flowers. 2002. 60 pp., 10¾ x 14¾; 41 books in the edition; sixteen are hors commerce, 25 are for sale.This project, which takes inspiration from Piet Mondrian's early, somewhat figurative work, unfolds around Gimblett's blazing kaleidoscopic watercolor spreads. The images in Mondrian's flowers bear a powerful relationship to Loney's poems — they are decidedly non-narrative but reveal a subtle family resemblance to the writing. Loney, who notes that "Nothing is so sacred or so despicable that it cannot, at some time, be uttered as poetry" has composed a text which is a lyrical and lucid counter meditation to the detonating images. Mondrian's flowers measures 10 x 14 inches; there are sixty pages which include three long poems and five double-page spread images. Four of the five images are exceptional monoprints made by Ruth Lingen in New York City — the fifth and final image in the book is an original double-page spread watercolor drawing by Gimblett — each one unique. The text was printed by Inge Bruggeman on Hahnemule Copperplate paper at Textura Letterpress in Portland, Oregon. Mondrian's flowers is bound in printed red Barcelona paper over boards with bright blue Barcelona endpapers and features an exposed binding which incorportates yellow, red, white, black and blue papers in a nod to Piet Mondrian's abstract work. The bindings were made by Judith Ivry in New York — the book is housed in a stamped black cloth covered slipcase. Each copy has been signed by poet and artist. $3,000.

Kimberly Lyons, Abracadabra. New York. Granary Books. 2000.
"In Kimberly Lyons's poetry of perception, it is the unmoving objects that do the striking when there's a collision — the floor hits the spoon, the small black pan hits the 'big kosher salt' that's falling into it. The resulting energy sends words zigzagging and meaning flashing like lightning. This makes sense, since these poems take place in the thunderstorm where the cold sciences of optics and physics meet psychology — object relations — in all its warm folds of association and sublimation. In the annals of the irreal, Giorgio de Chirico's monument paintings and Joseph Ceravolo's early poems also suffuse this cold light with heartbeat. What's absent in the book is Absence, for although the affect of these poems seems to be low — key, it's really just the tense relaxation of a poet of the ecstatic magic of paying attention. The depths of all the apparently empty spaces are filled: with music, with light." — Jordan Davis. $12.

Kimberly Lyons and Ed Epping, Mettle. (see Ed Epping).

M

Jackson Mac Low, Doings: Assorted Performance Pieces 1955–2002. 2005. 8 1/2" x 11" 248 pp. Termed "America's most indefatigable experimental poet" by Publishers Weekly, Jackson Mac Low is considered a master innovator. This volume brings together a comprehensive collection of his performance scores written, drawn and composed over the past 40 years, complete with their accompanying instructions and commentary, providing a superb overview of these remarkable compositions. This collection presents facsimile reprints of the artist's handwritten as well as typographical scripts providing a striking graphic presence to the work; five of the works are here produced as hand-tipped gatefolds. The book contains recent work as well as substantial sections from the near legendary "Vocabulary Gathas" and includes a studio-quality CD of audio recordings, produced by Charlie Morrow, several of which are co-composed and co-performed by Mac Low together with his wife, the poet, composer, and visual artist Anne Tardos. Three years in the making the CD and book yield a treasure trove of much previously unpublished work contributing to a more complete picture of this maestro of the avant-garde. Doings features an introduction by publisher Steve Clay and a cover by British artist Ian Tyson. ISBN 1-887123-70-9, PB. $50.00. A limited-edition hand bound edition with an original print by Tyson is also available direct from Granary Books.

Lenore Malen, The New Society for Universal Harmony, 2005, Granary Books and Slought Foundation. 9 1/2" x 10"; 148 pages, 150 photographs. In The New Society for Universal Harmony. Lenore Malen uses pseudo-documentary photos, video and audio transcriptions, testimonials, case histories, and arcane imagery to archive the functioning of her own reinvention of the utopian society established in Paris in 1793 by the followers of Franz Anton Mesmer, known as La societe de l'harmonie universelle. Malen's New Society comes out of her long-term installation project and live performances of case histories and treatments performed at the fabricated Society imagined in Athol Springs, New York. The book expands the scope of the project to include original fiction and essays by "fellow Harmonites" Jonathan Ames, Geoffrey O'Brien. Pepe Karmel, Nancy Princenthal, Irving Sandler, Susan Canning, Barbara Tannenbaum, Jim Long, Mark Thompson, and others, as well as, the first-person account of Malen's discovery and two-year involvement with the Society. ISBN 1-8887123-67-9 (Paper) $29.95.

Bernadette Mayer, Two Haloed Mourners. New York. Granary Books. 1998. 8 1/2" x 5 1/2"; 42 pages. "The book starts out dense, vagrant, proceeding on a combination of automatic writing and methodical structural repetitions. It picks up speed, changes gears from poetry to prose and back again, tries out a sestina where both beginning and ending words recur. Then something explodes midway through the book, as though all this formal experimentation was the rumbling and smoldering of Mt. Saint Helens erupting over the circumstances of Bernadette Mayer's move back to the Lower East Side from New Hampshire, where what was menace in the air of rural America is met head-on in the New York of Reagan and Wall Street. Two Haloed Mourners is a memoir of fear and loathing as the seventies somersault into the eighties. It's also about not shutting down, as a person, in the midst of that." —Ange Mlinko, Poetry Project Newsletter. 8 1/2" x 5 1/2;" 42 pages. First printing of 100. Second printing of 200 (1999). Third printing of 500 (2000). Cover and book design by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. ISBN 1-887123-40-7. $12.00.

Thomas McGrath, "Mediterranean". New York. Granary Books. 1986. 13" x 9 1/2"; 200 copies. Broadside. Designed and printed by Wesley B. Tanner at The Arif Press. $50.


Terence McKenna and Timothy C. Ely, Synesthesia. (see Timothy Ely).

Emily McVarish, Flicker, 2005. 10.125" x 8"; 48 pp, Edition of 45 of which 35 for sale. Flicker's design and production seek to embody the combinations of presence and absence that surround and consume us every day: the mold of a tenant held by an apartment's design (and of an era's beliefs by its facade), the abstraction of drivers in traffic, the simultaneous concentration and distraction of a screen watcher, the constant here-and-gone movement of a pedestrian. Flicker's text juxtaposes and intersects strains of these four figures — buildings, traffic, a watcher, and a walker – in the shared streets of a city to see if they ever add up to a whole. Flicker's pages are composed of thousands of pieces of lead type turned on their heads and printed as a solid matrix. Text occurs in the clearings of this background where type has been flipped rightside up to show its readable face. Also accommodated in the micro-grid of Flicker's pages are isolated wood letters and small duotones. The latter were printed from polymer plates of digital video stills. Further complicating relations of negative and positive space and of sequence, die-cut holes link images and texts through multiple spreads. Flicker is written, designed, and printed by Emily McVarish. The binding is by Coriander Reisbord with McVarish. $975.

Emily McVarish, Was Here. 2001, 13 1/4" x 10 3/4"; 64 pages, edition of 50: 10 hors commerce, 40 for sale. "Was Here takes Photography and the Book as distinct metaphors for History, playing them off one another to provoke and unwind their respective implications. As markers of a former presence and constellations of the unfulfilled, photographs punch holes in the book's inherent pretenses of organicism and linearity, calling attention to the citational nature of the book's very element, language. On the other hand, with its potential to carry out alternation and repetition over paginated time, a book can make tangible the temporal and ontological paradoxes at the heart of every photographic image. With obvious compositional and material attention to the medium (letterpress) in which both texts and photographs—labels and vignettes, captions and scenes, statements and evidence—are presented, Was Here seeks signs of the historical truths that link reproducibility and transcendence." —Emily McVarish. Designed and printed letterpress on Mohawk Superfine by Emily McVarish. All copies are signed and numbered by Ms. McVarish. $1,200.

Paul Metcalf, Firebird. New York. Granary Books & Chax Press. 1987. 9" x 7 1/4"; 236 copies. 36 in boards (10 hors commerce, 26 for sale), 200 in wrappers. Illustrations by Cynthia Miller. Cover paper handmade by Mary Beaton. Designed and printed by Charles Alexander at The Chax Press. The cloth edition is long out-of-print. We have a few in wrappers left at $150.

Wendy Miller, everyday colors. New York. Granary Books. 1998. everyday colorstakes its name from Martha Stewart's line of house paint at K-Mart. Floating paint chips, attached to the pages with velcro, reference the vocabularies of both modernist abstract painting and everyday domestic life. Images in the book are constructed from materials such as sponge, sandpaper, smoke, topographical paper from Thailand, onion prints, hand prints and fabric. "Working with the formal language of abstract painting and elements from popular culture, I treat the book as a container for a multitude of raw to refined experiences. Humor, key to appreciating and working with the chaos that permeates our life, pervades the book as does the uplifting and purifying powerof color, space and adornment." The cover image is based on the four gates of a Buddhist mandala. Throughout the book the use of color as temperature is inspired both by Buddhist practice and early abstract painting. The healing and cleansing role of color and adornment in the book references rituals and customs common in India as does the repeated curvaceous line form which is derived from rangolis, the intricately patterned designs drawn with powdered pigments by women each morning on the threshold of their dwelling to purify, honor and protect their house and the earth. everyday colorsplayfully engages the rousing drama of everyday life. The edition comprises sixteen copies each of which was drawn, painted and assembled by the artist in her studio in New York's East Village during the summer of 1998. Barbara Mauriello made the bindings. Of the sixteen copies, six were hors commerce and ten were for sale. (Out-of-print).

Barbara Moore, Some Things Else About Something Else. 1991. 12" x 4 1/2"; Folding brochure for a 1991 exhibition of Something Else Press at Granary Books in NYC. Designed by Philip Gallo. Essay by Barbara Moore. Includes a checklist of the publications of the press. Some copies are on heavy stock, some on light. $25.



N - O - P - Q - R

Maureen Owen and Yvonne Jaquette, Erosion's Pull, 2004. 17.5'' x 7.5''; 28pp. Erosion's Pull is, upon first glance, possessed of a paradoxically effortless feel. It is just so stunning. Moving beyong this entrance to the book, a depth and clarity of this project emerges. Owen and Jacquette

Ron Padgett and George Schneeman, Yodeling into a Kotex. 2003. This book, originally a one-of-a-kind collaboration produced in 1969, is a near perfect example of classic New York School spontaneity hitting fierce intellect. Yodeling is a miscellany of handwritten stanzas: found text, drawing, empasto, and images from pollyannaish advertisements, dimple-cheeked children's books, wallpaper swatches, personal photos and charming illustrations. Schneeman's signature nervy refinement meets, what Tom Clark described as, Padgett's "Audacity and grace go[ing] hand in hand with heady rumination, deadpan wit and a thrilling, slightly sinister proclivity for the unexpected." Inkjet prints of the original book were created on the Epson 10000 by Digital Plus, NYC and printed on Epson watercolor paper. The bindings were made by Judith Ivry in New York City. 8 1/2" x 5 3/4" — 26 pages. 41 copies signed by the artists in the edition, 1-25 for sale, 26-41 hors commerce. $1,200.

Ron Padgett, editor, Painter among Poets: The Collaborative Art of George Schneeman. 2004. Painter among Poets is the first retrospective presentation of the wide range of art works that Schneeman has created with poets over the past thirty-five years. It not only investigates Schneeman's enthusiasm for free-wheeling collaboration, it also considers his work as part of the remarkable modernist tradition of poet/painter collaboration. Always open to spontaneity and engagement, Schneeman encourages poets to contribute visual elements in order to create surprising works that neither artist nor poet could have done alone. As critic Carter Ratcliff, a poet himself, notes, "The Schneeman collaborations are completely unregulated, and they were carried out in free-flowing situations where art and poetry were only part of what was going on." Painter among Poets offers a behind-the-scenes look at the high-wire process of collaboration as an outgrowth of Schneeman¼s friendship with poets Bill Berkson, Ted Berrigan, Michael Brownstein, Tom Clark, Edwin Denby, Larry Fagin, Dick Gallup, Allen Ginsberg, Ted Greenwald, Steve Katz, Lewis MacAdams, Alice Notley, Ron Padgett, Harris Schiff, Peter Schjeldahl, Tom Veitch, Anne Waldman, Lewis Warsh, and many others. Twelve of Schneeman's collaborators have contributed personal commentaries and remembrances to Painter among Poets, which also features an essay by Ratcliff, an extensive conversation between Schneeman and Padgett, and a bibliography. Beautifully illustrated with sixty-seven color reproductions and twenty-three in black-and-white, Painter among Poets is an exciting reflection of the beauty, adventure, and energy of the work it documents. ISBN: 1-887123-66-0. $29.95.

Bob Perelman and Francie Shaw, Playing Bodies. Granary Books, 2004. 7.5" X 7.5", 116 pages, 52 images. Playing Bodies is a work in poetry and paintings by Bob Perelman and Francie Shaw. This work is, at once, a deeply specific, personal account and an undesignated construction which provides the perfect space on which to project our own ideas of self. The series of fifty-two paintings by Shaw and fifty-two poems by Perelman reflect an intensely united collaboration. Playing Bodies is a conversation between poet and painter, artists and readers which rewards in a more profound way than simple repartee. There is a plaintive depth below the surface of clean intelligence and that pitch of feeling is what makes this a complex investigation. This artists book features an introduction by Susan Stewart. ISBN 1-887123-64-4 (paper). $19.95.

Simon Pettet and Duncan Hannah. Abundant Treasures. 2001. 12" x 8", 28 pages, edition of 40. "'Quanto e possente amor!' (How powerful love is!)—the result of tenacity and belief? Abundant Treasures. No, simply what actually exists. Abundant Treasures wake up and it's already there. Abundant Treasures, a collaboration between Anglo-Americans and cosmic citizens Simon Pettet and Duncan Hannah... . A book of devotions. A book of scripture. A book that doesn't take itself too seriously. Abundant Treasures. Being the outcome of strict attention and utter neglect. Abundant Treasures. Being a series of exhortations and admonitions. Abundant Treasures. A set. Some good will come from this. Abundant Treasures. Microcosm macrocosm. Abundant Treasures. Somewhere there is the image of petals unfolding. Abundant Treasures... . Considerate. Fundamental. Refreshing. Sustaining. Abundant Treasures." —Simon Pettet. "Simon Pettet and I began our project Abundant Treasures back in 1994. We were fans of each other's work and shared a love of Joe Brainard, the beats, Balthus, and industrial England. Simon gave me thirty poems to work from and we narrowed it down to sixteen. It was an easy marriage between his text and my images, such as the recurring motif of reading and the theme of fleeting beauty, dear to both of us." —Duncan Hannah. Printed letterpress then handcolored by Duncan Hannah. Signed by Simon Pettet and Duncan Hannah. $2,500.

Rodney Phillips and John Jurayj, Five Poems/Five Paintings. 2003. Phillips's unadorned free-verse lays bare a later day New York School sensibility and unassuming lyricism. These poems transfigure the everyday like letters home, lending small occurrences significance because they have been noted and written around. Each poem is accompanied by its visual twin; oil paintings by John Jurayj executed with a delicacy usually reserved for lighter material, watercolor or gouache. The interplay of verbal and visual is apparent in content as well as form. Five Poems/Five Paintings was printed letterpress by Inge Bruggeman of Textura Letterpress in Portland, Oregon. $75.

Rodney Phillips and Steven Clay, A Secret Location on the Lower East Side: Adventures in Writing, 1960-1980: A Sourcebook of Information. (see Steve Clay).

David Rathman, Roar Shocks. New York. Granary Books. 1998. 10 1/2" x 8 3/4"; Printed letterpress from metal engravings. 33 bound copies, 10 sets of boxed prints. Roar Shockscontains texts from treatises on the Rorschach procedure, which were subsequently modified by David Rathman through multiple Xeroxing. Rathman's evocative page compositions combine these ambiguous texts, charts, and snippets of dialogue with stark black and white ink drawings. Printed by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. Binding by Jill Jevne. Bound book or boxed set of prints: $2,500.

David Rathman and Jerome Rothenberg, Pictures of the Crucifixion. (see Jerome Rothenberg).


Harry Reese, Funagainstawake. New York. Granary Books. 1997. 13" x 9 1/2"; Monotypes and letterpress. 30 copies. 10 hors commerce, 20 for sale. This book concentrates on issues of language, technology, and artistic vision as presented in James Joyce's classic work Finnegans Wake, published in 1939. The „ten thunders,¾ or one hundred-letter words, from Joyce's book provide source material and titles for this series of monotypes. Funagainstawake plays on the satirical intent of the novel in which language is used inventively to entertain and to wake up its readers. Harry Reese states that „Making art is a kind of research, an investigation of what we know, what we don't know, and something in-between. My prints are meditations on some of these thoughts and possibilities.... What interests me is that each thunder can be considered as representing a compression of words, puns, images, suggestions, and inferences that correspond to a particular technological period in the history of western civilization and culture.¾ Mr. Reese's examination of Finnegans Wake has been shaped by the work of Marshall McLuhan, Eric McLuhan, Bob Dobs, and by artists such as John Cage, Robert Rauschenberg and Dick Higgins. Each book contains ten monotypes printed by the artist in his studio in Isla Vista, California, with an original image on vinyl for the title page. Wire-edge binding by Daniel Kelm and staff at the Wide Awake Garage. Boxes by Jill Jevne. Exquisite. Monotypes and letterpress. (Out-of-print).

Jerome Rothenberg and Susan Bee, The Burning Babe & Other Poems. 2005. 12 [h] x 9 [w] inches, 36 pages. Printed digitally on Innova smooth white 100% cotton paper using pigment inks at Silicon Gallery Fine Art Prints Ltd. in Philadelphia during the summer of 2005. Bound in printed orange cloth over boards by Judith Ivry in New York. The edition comprises 41 copies of which 25 are for sale. $3,250.

Jerome Rothenberg and Steven Clay, editors, A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections about the Book & Writing. New York. Granary Books. 2001. 10" X 7"; 580 pp; 50 black and white images plus full color fold-out image of Sonia Delauney's and Blaise Cendrar's La Prose du Transsiberien. A Book of the Book extends the work begun in The Book, Spiritual Instrument (edited by Rothenberg and David Guss) about which poet and critic Charles Bernstein writes (and which applies equally to the present volume), "œRothenberg and company read the book as metaphor for aesthetic framing devices, but they also read frames as metaphoric books. In a series of exemplary essays on, and demonstrations of, what might be called the ethnopoetics of the book, books from a wide range of cultural traditions are portrayed as radical extenders of form rather than neutral vessels of content. The result is a vision of books as laboratories for the invention and performance of perceptual systems: new worlds carved out of the wilderness of human thought and language." A Book of the Book breaks down into four  sections: "Pre-faces" includes work by Rothenberg, Steve McCaffery & bp Nichol, Keith A. Smith, Michael Davidson, Anne Waldman, Jacques Derrida, Edmond Jabès (translated by Rosmarie Waldrop), among others; "The Opening of the Field" includes work by Gertrude Stein, William Blake, Susan Howe, Maurice Blanchot, Marjorie Perloff, André Breton and Jerome McGann among others; "The Book is as Old as Fire & Water" includes work on Guruwari designs, novelty books, pattern poetry, celestial alphabets among others while "The Book to Come" presents work by Tom Phillips, Johanna Drucker, Alison Knowles, Charles Bernstein, Jess (a complete re-issue of his 1960 work "O!"), Ian Hamilton Finlay, Barbara Fahrner and much more. Cloth ISBN: 1-887123-29-6 (Out-of-Print). Paperback ISBN: 1-887123-28-8. $34.95.

Jerome Rothenberg and David Guss, editors, The Book, Spiritual Instrument. New York. Granary Books. 1996. 164 pages, 9" x 7"; Paperback original. Essays, musings, pictures, interviews, etc. by Stephane Mallarmé, Edmond Jabès, Becky Cohen, Alison Knowles, George Quasha, Dick Higgins, Karl Young, David Meltzer, Tina Oldknow, J. Stephen Lansing, Paul Eluard, David Guss, Jed Rasula, Gershom Scholem, Jerome Rothenberg and Herbert Blau. "Prefaced by Mallarme's famous dictum that 'everything in the world exists in order to end up as a book,' this spirited collection demonstrates the reverse as well: everything in the book exists in order to end up in the world. Edited in 1982 by Jerome Rothenberg, the greatest American anthologist of the postwar years, and his associate, anthropologist and translator David Guss, The Book, Spiritual Instrument pushes the envelope not only on what books contain but also on what they are. Rothenberg and company read the book as metaphor for aesthetic framing devices, but they also read frames as metaphoric books. In a series of exemplary essays on, and demonstrations of, what might be called the ethnopoetics of the book, books from a wide range of cultural traditions are portrayed as radical extenders of form rather than neutral vessels of content. The result is a vision of books as laboratories for the invention and performance of perceptual systems: new worlds carved out of the wilderness of human thought and language." -- Charles Bernstein, Poet, Editor and David Gray Professor of Poetry and Poetics, SUNY-Buffalo. ISBN: 1-887123-08-3. $21.95.

Jerome Rothenberg and David Rathman, Pictures of the Crucifixion. New York. Granary Books. 1996. 11 3/4" x 6 1/2"; 30 pages; Letterpress. 130 copies. 30 hors commerce, 100 for sale. A book of poems by the acclaimed poet Jerome Rothenberg, a pioneer in the fields of performance poetry and ethnopoetics. Drawings by David Rathman, a painter whose works are deeply influenced by writing. Five vivid drawings, eight lucid poems. Designed and printed by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. Binding by Jill Jevne. Letterpress. ISBN: 1-887123-07-5. $500.

Jerome Rothenberg and Ian Tyson, The Case for Memory. 2001. 20 pages, 11" x 8 1/8." There are 20 pages printed in several colors including 4 full page geometric images by Ian Tyson. The book was designed and printed in France by Eric Linard Editions in an edition of 50 copies for Granary Books. Edition of 50; 20 copies in wrappers signed by poet and artist accompanied by a folder containing an additional suite of the Tyson images, $1,250; 30 copies in wrappers signed by poet and artist, $750.

Susan Rothenberg and Anne Waldman, Kin. New York. Granary Books. 1997. 9" x 7 1/8"; Letterpress. 150 copies. 35 hors commerce, 115 for sale. Susan Rothenberg's eight subtle drawings in black cray-pas of animals in pairs (yaks, horses, cats, humans) sounds the call to which Anne Waldman responds in new texts, which range from 'overheard conversations' to lyric poetry to 'found' scientific data reportage. Pages fold out to reveal text flanking the images which have been masterfully printed to recreate the waxy nature and smudging around the edges of the original drawings. Printed by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. Bound in cloth by Jill Jevne. Letterpress on Rives Heavyweight. ISBN: 1-887123-12-1. $750.

Holton Rower, Non. New York. Granary Books. 1995. 15 1/2" x 11"; 41 copies. 16 hors commerce. 25 for sale. Miraculous work from the author of Nettles. Dozens of materials (from barge cement to New York State Highway Commission road paint) were used in making this most unusual & ambitious nonrepresentational book. Non truly defies any reasonable concept of „publication.¾ From the colophon: „CARDBOARD-Toilet paper cores. BARGE CEMENT-Quabang Corporation, N. Brookfield, Massachusetts. THERAPY- Dr. Richard Travers. SOAKING MEDIUM- Municipal water, New York Reservoir Service. BICYCLE TIRES- Made in Taiwan, Korea, Germany, Thailand, China, France, and the United States supplied by Canal Street Bicycles, New York...¾ and so on. With the artist's inventive choice of varied materials, this book achieves a 3" spine in 50 pages and weighs in at 9 pounds, 6 ounces on the scale. Bound in the wire-edge style by Daniel E. Kelm and staff at the Wide Awake Garage. Wrapped in an off-white fabric and secured with an extra-wide rubber binder. $12,000.


S


Jay Sanders and Charles Bernstein, editors, Poetry Plastique. 2001. 7" x 10"; 96 pp; 40 black and white images. A catalogue for the exhibition at the Marianne Boesky Gallery, featuring works and writing by Carl Andre, David Antin. Arakawa, Susan Bee, Wallace Berman, Mei-mei Berssenbrugge and Kiki Smith, Christian B–k, John Cage, Clark Coolidge and Philip Guston, Robert Creeley and Cletus Johnson, Johanna Drucker and Brad Freeman, Hollis Frampton, Madeline Gins, Kenneth Goldsmith, Robert Grenier, Lyn Hejinian and Emilie Clark, Tan Lin, Jackson Mac Low, Steve McCaffery, Emily McVarish , Tom Phillips, Nick Piombino, Leslie Scalapino, Mira Schor, Robert Smithson, Michael Snow, Richard Tuttle and Charles Bernstein, Darren Wershler-Henry. "Not words and pictures but poems as visual objects (read: subjects). Not poems about pictures but pictures that are poems. Not words affixed to a blank page but letters in time. Not works closed in a book but hanging on a wall or suspended from the ceiling or rising from the floor or sounding from inside a figure or embedded with paint on a canvas or written in the sky or flickering on a screen." — from the Preface by co-curator Charles Bernstein. ISBN: 1-887123-51-2. (Out-of-print).

Aram Saroyan, The Beatles. 2000. 12 pages, 3" x 4"; This minimal work was first published by Aram Saroyan in 1970. Our edition was split with Mr. Saroyan and mailed out as a New Year's Greeting for January 1, 2000. Printed by hand at SoHo Letterpress and hand-sewn by Amber Phillips. (Out-of-print).

Leslie Scalapino & Marina Adams, The Tango. 2001. 13" x 9 3/4"; 28 pp, 39 color & 23 b/w images. "The Tango is a collaboration between poet, Leslie Scalapino, and artist, Marina Adams. The serial poem, by Leslie Scalapino, 'places' conceptual phenomena—such as roses and language-subjectivity—together as if they are 'materials' by being 'text only.' The text is juxtaposed, as it transpires on its own separately alongside, vertically, a series of photographs occurring in the order in which they were taken on the roll. The content of the photographs, taken by Scalapino, is debating monks at the Sera Monastery outside Lhasa in Tibet. Alongside text and photographs, Adams has juxtaposed painting on found material that is patterned cloth, as serial tapestry akin to Buddhist tankas as if 'alongside' that tradition, a conceptual extension of these that is 'original.'"— Leslie Scalapino. "Leslie Scalapino has developed great expertise in presenting a hard-edged picture of the world. We are constantly made to realize that what she's showing us is the world as we have constructed it... " —Philip Whalen. ISBN: 1-887123-41-5. $29.95.

George Schneeman and Ted Berrigan, In The Nam What Can Happen?. (see Ted Berrigan).

George Schneeman and Ron Padgett, Yodeling into a Kotex. 2003. (See Ron Padgett).

George Schneeman and Anne Waldman, Homage to Allen G. New York. Granary Books. 1997. 14" x 12"; Letterpress from magnesium engravings. 145 copies. 100 on Rives BFK (30 hors commerce, 70 for sale), 45 on Dieu Donné handmade paper (15 hors commerce, 30 for sale). This portfolio consists of 10 collaborative works (visual images by George Schneeman; words by Anne Waldman) plus the colophon housed either in a cloth-covered folder (for those printed on BFK) or a cloth-covered clamshell box (for those on Dieu Donné). The project is based on a series of traced sketches of Allen Ginsberg's photographs. After Mr. Ginsberg's death, Schneeman and Waldman converted the tracings into this homage. Printed by Philip Gallo. $500 (BFK); $850 (Dieu Donné).


Carolee Schneemann, Vulva's Morphia. New York. Granary Books. 1997. 11" x 8 1/2"; Vulva looks over the shoulder of the artist/scholar and gives a running commentary on the state of affairs at the end of the millennium. "Vulva reads biology and discovers she is an amalgam of proteins and oxytocin hormones which govern all her desires." The book consists of thirty-six images made on the Canon color laser printer and mounted on Hahnemuehle gray premium velour paper. The text was printed letterpress by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. Bound in red velvet by Jill Jevne. Housed in plexiglass slipcase. Edition of thirty-five of which twenty-five are for sale. $3,500.

Kurt Schwitters and Barbara Fahrner, A Flower Like A Raven. New York. Granary Books. 1996. 12 1/2" x 12 1/4"; Pen, ink, watercolor, lino-cut, "cliché-print," and letterpress. 50 copies. 10 hors commerce, 40 for sale. Poems by Kurt Schwitters are printed in German as well as in English translations by Jerome Rothenberg. Barbara Fahrner made the visual images and did the hand work. The images and text were variously printed and drawn using pen, ink, watercolor, lino-cut and "cliché-print." Printing by Dieter Sdun in Germany. Binding by Jill Jevne. ISBN: 1-887123-13-x. $2,500.  

Pati Scobey, The Back of Time. New York. Granary Books. 1992. 15" x 9"; Relief rolled etching, intaglio, watercolor, pen and ink drawing, collage. 25 copies. 10 (plus 2 artist's proofs) hors commerce, 15 for sale. Scobey's organic, primordial shapes and colorful light against darkness suggest a whimsical yet contemplative universe. Laser split pages and alternate openings to the book cause the reader to enter a journey through the cosmos and time. The relief etchings were editioned by Pati Scobey and Katherine Kuehn at Ricochet Works. Binding by Daniel E. Kelm at the Wide Awake Garage. (Out-of-print).

Francie Shaw and Bob Perelman, Playing Bodies. (see Bob Perelman).

Jane Sherry, Venus Unbound. New York. Granary Books. 1993. 12" x 9"; 46 pages. Letterpress with photo-metallic collages, painting and drawing. 41 copies. 11 hors commerce, 30 for sale. Sherry's dream journals were the source for text in this book, which is narrative in form, and personal or confessional in theme. Imagery of bondage and pain becomes increasingly positive and intimate. The artist's original paintings were treated with gouache, pen and ink, rubber stamps, and collage. Typography and printing by Philip Gallo. Binding by Daniel Kelm at the Wide Awake Garage. Housed in a box by Jill Jevne. $2,500.

Jack Smith, The Beautiful Book. Granary Books, co-published with The Plaster Foundation, Inc. The only autonomous collection of Jack Smith's photographs to appear during his lifetime, The Beautiful Book comprises 19 hand-tipped black-and-white contact prints (2 1/4 x 2 1/4 inches). The photographs were produced mainly during the course of extended shooting sessions in Smith's Lower East Side apartment. Most date from the winter of 1962, although a few are earlier—including the final "signature" photograph, a portrait of the artist on the steps beneath the Brooklyn Bridge taken by filmmaker Ken Jacobs. Nearly half the photographs feature the artist Marian Zazeela, who provided the design for the book's silk-screened cover. Smith and his associates assembled the books during the late spring and early summer of 1962, before shooting began on Flaming Creatures. Published and distributed by Piero Heliczer's press, the dead language, The Beautiful Book was originally priced at "4 dollars or 16 nouveau francs or 24 shillings," and advertised with a statement from the filmmaker Ron Rice: "we studied these photographs with keen eye discovering new & more beautiful images hidden in every dissolve & curve of the draperies & silks which ran through these masterpieces like some long lost mysterious fume from byzantium." The 2001 Beautiful Book is a true facsmile produced by Granary Books in collaboration with the Plaster Foundation, Inc. New prints have been made from the original negatives and hand-tipped onto Canford Buttercup paper. The covers are silk-screened in two colors on Tweedweave paper and saddle-stitched. The printing and arrangement of the photographs, choice of materials, and nature of the binding are consistent with the four copies of the book given by Smith to Marian Zazeela in 1962. The 200 copies in the present edition are numbered and authenticated by the Plaster Foundation, Inc. Sixty copies are hors commerce; 140 copies are for sale. $425.

Buzz Spector, A Passage. New York. Granary Books. 1994. 8 1/2" x 6 1/4"; 360 pages. Offset. 48 copies. 13 hors commerce, 35 for sale. A Passage develops a fully integrated relationship between book form and textual material, with writing, design, and hand-torn pages by Buzz Spector. Using the method of his unique altered bookworks, Spector has torn these pages in a sequence of lessening increments to make a cross section of his text. Each and every volume in the edition has been altered in the same way, leaving a shredded field of typographic characters whose åmiraculous' legibility gives further meaning to the poignant personal narrative Spector has written. „A Passage...presents itself as a representative artifact. The title itself is generic, suggesting that, had this one not been chosen, another passage would've sufficed as well. And its binding and typography, so unobtrusive and anonymous, would make it hard to pick out on a library shelf. Clearly A Passage is everybook; yet as much as these production values efface themselves, this artifact aggressively confronts us with its disappearance from our culture.¾ (Joe Elliot, The Journal of Artists' Books.) Since 1981, Buzz Spector has created unique and editioned volumes and installation pieces that confront the cultural significance and history of the book. As a writer, editor, and book designer, he employs the materials of his tradeãbooks and found textsãwhich he alters through tearing, cutting, painting, and other processes. Mr. Spector's intention is not to destroy, but to transform books and language. Typeset by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press and printed offset by Brad Freeman at InterPlanetary Productions. Bound by Jill Jevne. (Out-of-print).

Jack Spicer and Fran Herndon, Golem. New York. Granary Books. 1999. 5 1/2" x 8 1/2", 20 pp; The manuscript of Spicer's Golem poems was discovered by Fran Herndon and Kevin Killian in 1997 in a "...dog-eared manila folder. The first poem in this series saw print -- in the 'Spicer issue' of Manroot --only because Lew Ellingham had copied it onto a brown paper bag after Spicer posted in on the wall of Gino & Carlo's bar. That it had any successors few guessed or knew." The seven images accompanying the six poems are from Herndon's "Sports Collages," her "painterly re-working of pop images cut from the pages of Sports Illustrated and other mass-market magazines...." "Spicer and Herndon draw on [the] complex legend [of the golem] to animate their conception of the athlete-and poet-as hero and monster, corpse and avenger. For these artists, the corruption of innocence under the nexus of capital is as simple as, and as confounding as, a 'fix.'" (All quotes from the afterword.)  Golem is designed and printed letterpress by Philip Gallo at the Hermetic Press. The images are beautifully reproduced in full color. The edition consists of 150 copies signed by Fran Herndon and bound at the Campbell Logan Bindery in paper over boards. One hundred copies are for sale. $150.


Jack Spicer, "Rabbits do not know what they are". New York. Granary Books. 1986. 13" x 9 1/2"; 300 copies. Broadside. Designed and printed by Gerald Lange at The Bieler Press. $75.

Gary Sullivan & Nada Gordon, Swoon. (see Nada Gordon).

T - U - V

Anne Tardos, The Dik-dik's Solitude: New & Selected Works. 2003. 6" x 9" 320 pp. At every level of Anne Tardos's paintings, films, poetry and cross-genre work the familiar is engaged while acknowledging the violently contested landscape of what we think we know. Connection is the dominant mode of composition. A brand new vernacular emerges when Tardos's unique voice announces itself in her rapid language switches, gleeful humor and rare willingness to blend the personal and political. With new and previously published work as well as an introductory interview with the author and prominent poet Lyn Hejinian, The Dik-dik's Solitude is the first comprehensive collection of work by this significant contemporary artist and writer. ISBN 1-887123-61-X. PB, $17.95

Joseph Torra, Michael Gizzi and William Corbet, editors, The Blind See Only This World: Poems for John Weiners. (see William Corbet).

Ian Tyson & Jerome Rothenberg, The Case for Memory. (see Jerome Rothenberg).

W

Anne Waldman & Lewis Warsh, editors, Angel Hair Sleeps with a Boy in My Head: The Angel Hair Anthology. 2001. 9" x 7". 630 pages, edition of 3000. This anthology presents material selected from the collection of Angel Hair magazine and books edited by Anne Waldman and Lewis Warsh between 1966 and 1978. Included are substantial sections of writing (in some cases entire books) from an astonishing range of poets, including Clark Coolidge, Alice Notley, Hannah Weiner, Tom Clark, Bernadette Mayer, Kenward Elmslie, Robert Creeley, Joanne Kyger, Bill Berkson, Ted Greenwald, Lorenzo Thomas, John Wieners, Joe Brainard, Ron Padgett and the editors, to name just a few. From the nascent St. Mark's Poetry Project on the Lower East Side of Manhattan to Bolinas and Boulder, Angel Hair published an idiosyncratic cross-section of innovative writing in distinctive format—it is one of the longest-lived and most influential publishers on the small press scene. The anthology is supplemented with short memoirs from about twenty writers. It also includes an annotated checklist by Aaron Fischer and Steven Clay that comprises a citation and photograph of each of the approximately eighty books, magazines, broadsides and catalogs issued by the Press. Ms. Waldman and Mr. Warsh each contribute introductions. Designed by Amber Phillips. Illustrated with black & white halftones. Printed offset. Bound in paper wrappers. ISBN: 1-887123-49-0. $28.95.

Anne Waldman and Susan Rothenberg, Kin. (see Susan Rothenberg).

Anne Waldman and George Schneeman, Homage to Allen G. (see George Schneeman).

Keith Waldrop and Clark Coolidge, Bomb. 2000. (see Clark Coolidge).

Lewis Warsh, Bustin's Island '68. New York. Granary Books. 1996. 8 1/2" x 5 1/2"; 36 pages. Black and white photographs mounted onto paper. Text printed by hand at Soho letterpress. 70 copies. 20 hors commerce, 50 for sale. Bustin's Island '68 was originally composed and produced by Lewis Warsh as a private manuscript book, a single copy, in 1992. The Granary Books edition is based on the original, which is now housed in the Berg Collection of the New York Public Library. Warsh's newly written text accompanies a group of black and white photographs taken in 1968 during and after the time he and Anne Waldman visited Ted & Sandy Berrigan and family at the summer home of Lee Crabtree at Bustin's Island off the coast of Maine. The guileless, innocent character which sparkles in the late 60s photographs stands in stark relief to the darkness shrouded in the over the shoulder glance back of the text. This is a remarkably lucid portrait of a time and place, and the price paid for admission into the realm of experience. Poets Anne Waldman, Ted Berrigan, Lewis Warsh, Joanne Kyger & Tom Clark are here glimpsed up close. Printed letterpress by Joe Elliot at Soho Letterpress, signed by the author. 21 Black and white photographs hand-mounted by Jill Jevne. $350.

Lewis Warsh and Julie Harrison, Debtor's Prison. 2001. 6 3/4" X 6 3/4"; 136 pps, 62 duotone images, edition of 1000. Debtor's Prison is the first collaboration between poet/novelist Lewis Warsh and video/visual artist Julie Harrison, in which skewed and closely-cropped black & white video stills from Harrison's primitive-style documentary and performance tapes of the 1970s are paired with stark lines of text written in response by Warsh. "Debtor's Prison combines the intelligences and sensibilities of two compelling artists, Lewis Warsh and Julie Harrison, and through their ways of seeing and observing, investigates the strange call and response between forms. The ambiguities of meaning, life's pleasures and anguish, find a beautiful and disturbing home here." ãLynne Tillman. ISBN: Paper: 1-887123-58-X. $24.95.

Lewis Warsh & Anne Waldman, editors, Angel Hair Sleeps with a Boy in My Head: The Angel Hair Anthology. (see Anne Waldman)

Jonathan Williams, "Noah Webster to Wee Lorine Niedecker." New York. Granary Books.1986. 6 1/8" x 4 3/8"; 200 signed copies made. (Note: 21 copies have been additionally signed by the printer and are hors commerce.) Card within a printed envelope within another printed envelope. Designed and printed for Origin Books (an alter ego of Granary) by Gerald Lange at the Bieler Press. $40.

Jonathan Williams and R.B.Kitaj, Aposiopeses: Odds & Ends. New York. Granary Books.1988. 10 1/4" x 6 1/4"; Letterpress. 165 copies. 65 in boards (15 hors commerce, 50 for sale), 100 in wrappers. Aposieopeses is defined on the title page as åSudden bursts of silence.' "The book gathers a collection of åOdds & Ends' ‚ words which, when asked to expand, „include two [of Williams's] constant preoccupations: eccentrics and epitaphs." For those who take the time to listen, his [Williams's] is a voice firm enough to scratch, clear enough to shine, and deep enough to vibrate in your mind long after the reading.' ‚ J.W. Bonner in The Arts Journal. The frontispiece portrait of the poet is by R.B. Kitaj. Designed and printed by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. (Out-of-print).

Jonathan Williams, "A discrete sign on the Steinway...". New York. Granary Books.1986. 6 3/4" x 9 5/8"; 30 copies. Broadside. Designed and printed by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. (Out-of-print).

Trevor Winkfield and Kenward Elmslie, Cyberspace. 2000. (see Kenward Elmslie).

Trevor Winkfield and Larry Fagin, Dig and Delve. 2000. (see Larry Fagin).

Jane Wodening, From the Book of Legends. (see Jane Brakhage).

Jane Wodening, What the Ambulance Driver Said (a story with sentence diagram). 1998. 9 3/4" x 5 3/4"; The reader first approaches this story as a single paragraph. The book then extends to reveal the paragraph as a diagrammed sentence, folding out to twenty-six inches. Designed and printed by Philip Gallo at the Hermetic Press. (Out-of-print).

X - Y - Z

Paul Zelevansky, The Case for the Burial of Ancestors. 1991. Exhibition pamphlet with an essay by Richard Kostelanetz. (Out-of-print).

John Zorn, editor, Arcana: Musicians on Music. 2000. (co-published with Hips Road). An anthology of writings, working notes, scores, interviews and manifestos from an incredible collection of avant-garde/experimental musicians and composers familiar to those with an ear to the ground of what's new and interesting in recent music. There are twenty-nine contributors to this rich collection and they include many of the most respected, innovative and provocative players and composers in the current generation. To name a few: Mark Dresser, John Oswald, Marilyn Crispell, John Zorn, Bill Frisell, Ikue Mori, Larry Ochs, Elliott Sharp, Anthony Coleman, Fred Frith, David Rosenboom, George Lewis, Guy Klucevsek, Peter Garland, Z'ev and Gerry Hemingway. "It is understood that a critic's job is not an easy one, but it is a source of great surprise and disappointment to me that after more than twenty years of music-making on the New York scene, except for the occasional review in trade magazines/periodicals, not one single writer has ever come forward to champion or even to intelligently analyze exactly what it is that we have been doing." 1-887123-27-X. $34.95.

© 2001 Granary Books
168 Mercer Street, 2nd floor, New York, NY 10012 USA
tel: (212) 337-9979 | fax: (212) 337-9774 | info@granarybooks.com