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The Larry Goodell / Duende Archive

The Larry Goodell / Duende Archive is a unique record of the thriving poetry and small press cultures of the Southwest (and New Mexico in particular) from the early 1960s to the present. This rich trove of materials emerges from and documents key moments of the burgeoning Mimeograph Revolution.

The Fervent Valley editors on road by the Thunderbird Bar in Placitas: Larry Goodell, Lenore Goodell, Stephen Rodefer, Bill Pearlman and Charlie Vermont (photo by Wayne Jones).

The widespread movement of small presses and little magazines was bolstered by the Vancouver and Berkeley Poetry Conferences of 1963 and 1965. Larry Goodell attended both and he became, like many of his fellow attendees, a poet / publisher (others include Clark Coolidge and Michael Palmer [Joglars], Jonathan Green [Gnomon], and Fred Wah, who was living in Albuquerque at the time, [Sum]).

In many ways this literary culture is similar to others throughout the United States. However, as Robert Creeley wrote in his forward to New Mexico Poetry Renaissance (Red Crane Books, 1994): “The generalities quickly blur. Poetry is, if anything, literally specific to place and person alike. Perhaps the very fact of New Mexico’s amplitude means one has to find a way to anchor, or else disappear.”

Poetry for me is making things, at least making things happen, so that a
3-dimensional poetry is possible and the ancient voices of ceremony are given voice . . . and in a time of cold-shouldering big publishers I advocate the Poet as Publisher.
          — Larry Goodell

The archive contains a complete collection of Duende Press publications, plus all the extant press documents including correspondence, manuscripts, and business records. The archive also includes selections from Larry Goodell’s library of books, pamphlets, broadsides, reading flyers and ephemera, recordings and much more. Together, these materials provide a detailed chronicle of the inner workings of one of the central magazines of the mimeograph period.

 

Of Particular Note in the Archive

There are approximately 500 named correspondence folders in the archive. Of particular note is the correspondence between Goodell and fellow poet / publishers and Duende authors including:

Barry Alpert (Vort), Dick Bakken (Salted Feathers), Joe Bottone (Oriental Blue Streak), Ronald Bayes (St. Andrews Review), Carol Bergé (Center), Doug Blazek (Olé, Open Skull), John Brandi (Tooth of Time), Bobby Byrd (Cinco Puntos Press, From A Window, The Rio Grande Writers Newsletter), Hank Chapin (Blue Grass), Jack Collom (The), Robert Creeley (Black Mountain Review), Judson Crews (The Naked Ear, Suck Egg Mule, et al.), William Dodd, Larry Eigner, Lewis Ellingham and David Franks (Magazine), Clayton Eshleman (Caterpillar), John Fowler (Grist), A. Frederick Franklin, Gene Frumkin (Coastlines, San Marcos Review, et al.), Judy Grahn (Woman’s Press Collective), Jonathan Greene (Gnomon), Latif (William) Harris (Ante), Lyn Hejinian (Tuumba), Ken Irby, LeRoi Jones (Yugen, The Floating Bear), Robert Kelly (Matter), d.a. levy (The Marrahwanna Quarterly, et al.), Marvin Malone (The Wormwood Review), Norman Moser (Illuminations), Maureen Owen (Telephone), Bill Pearlman (Fervent Valley), Charles Potts (Litmus, The Temple), Margaret Randall (El Corno Emplumado), Tom Raworth (Goliard Press, Outburst, et al.), Carlos Reyes (Pliego, Potpourri), Kell Robertson (Desperado, Rottenrap), Stephen Rodefer (Fervent Valley, Pick Pocket Poets), John Sinclair (Whe’re/, Work, et al.), Gino Clays Sky (Out of Sight, Wild Dog), Nathaniel Tarn and Janet Rodney (Cape-Goliard Press, Weaselsleeves Press), Bill Thompson (The Tolar Creek Syndicate), Charlie Vermont (Two Charlies, Fervent Valley), Fred Wah (Sum), Jon and “Gypsy” Lou Webb (The Outsider), Richard Watson, Jonathan Williams (Jargon Society), and Geoff Young and Laura Chester (Stooge, The Figures).

There are approximately 750 books, pamphlets, and broadsides; 300 magazine titles comprising 1100 issues; and 400 poetry-reading flyers.


Larry Goodell Biography

Larry Goodell was born in Roswell, New Mexico in 1935 and studied with Robert Creeley at the University of New Mexico. He is a performance poet, playwright, music maker, and publisher. His life has been a model of, as he calls it, “Poet as Publisher.”

Robert Creeley, Bobbie Creeley (Bobbie Louise Hawkins), Ronald Bayes, Sara and Kate Creeley, a neighbor kid and Larry Goodell in 1964.

In 1963 he moved to Placitas, New Mexico. Caught up in the “whirlwind” of the Vancouver Poetry Conference of 1963 (which he attended) and the “New American Poetry Pantheon,” Larry bought a Rex-Rotary mimeo machine and published his first issue of Duende (dedicated to publishing the poetry of his friend Ronald Bayes) in 1964. [Larry Goodell. “musing backwards to duende.” Originally published in Beatitude, Golden Anniversary 1959–2009, Latif Harris, ed.] Click to read a PDF of “musing backwards to duende”

After publishing fourteen issues of Duende (each dedicated to the work of one poet), he published the one-shot Oriental Blue Streak (1968), followed by the four-issue run of Fervent Valley (1972–74). In addition to numerous broadsides, Duende Press has published books including Bill Pearlman’s Inzorbital (1974), Jean Calais’ Villon (translation and commentary by Stephen Rodefer, for whom Jean Calais is a pseudonym) (1976), Stephen Rodefer’s One or Two Love Poems from the White World (1976), and Judson Crews’s The Noose, a Retrospective: 4 Decades (1980).

Larry Goodell performing “Serious Art” (photographs by Lenore Goodell).

In 1972, Larry and his friend Stephen Rodefer travelled doing poetry performances. Since the 1970’s, Larry has actively been organizing poetry readings for numerous venues throughout New Mexico, always, as he says, with the aim “to offer many poets a place and audience for their work.”

His own books include, Seven Sonnets (Duende Press,1987), Firecracker Soup: Poems 1980–1987 (Cinco Puntos Press, 1990), Out of Secrecy (Yoo-Hoo Press 1992), Here on Earth: 59 Sonnets (La Alameda Press, 1996), and Pieces of Heart: Poems 2014 (Beatlick Press, 2015). He has been published in numerous anthologies, including In Company: An Anthology of New Mexico Poets After 1960 (Lee Bartlett, V.B. Price, Dianne Edwards, eds., University of New Mexico Press, 2004) and New Mexico Poetry Renaissance (Sharon Niederman and Miriam Sagan, eds., foreword by Robert Creeley, Red Crane Books, 1994). His blog lotsa, larry goodell (larrygoodell.wordpress.com) has been an active document of his life, poetry and numerous activities since 2009.

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Selected Highlights from the Collection

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Larry Goodell, ed. Duende, no. 1. 1964. This entire issue is devoted to publishing Ronald Bayes, History of the Turtle, Book 1.

For the first issue of Duende, Larry published Ronald Bayes, his friend and fellow student from the Vancouver Poetry Conference (English 410). Bayes would later go on to found the St. Andrews Review and the St. Andrews Press.

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Larry Goodell, ed. Duende, no. 2. 1964. This entire issue is devoted to publishing A. Fredric Franklyn, Virgules and Déjà Vu.

Larry met Franklyn at the Vancouver Conference.

 

 

 

 

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Larry Goodell, ed. Duende, no. 3. Apr. 1964. This entire issue is devoted to publishing Richard Watson, Cockcrossing.

Richard Watson and Larry met in Charles Olson’s class at the Vancouver Poetry Conference in 1963.

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Larry Goodell, ed. Duende, no. 4. Apr. 1964. This entire issue is devoted to publishing Kenneth Irby, The Roadrunner Poem, his first book. Signed.

On his blog, Larry recollects that his friendship with Ken Irby “developed through many letters and visits to Berkeley when he was living there, including a confab at his house with Paul Blackburn, Robert Kelly, Clayton Eshleman, Harvey Bialy and my wife, Lenore, in 1969. All the time he was at Tufts, and in Denmark, and then in Lawrence, Kansas, we exchanged letters and poems frequently until tapering off in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s.” The archive contains 4 folders of correspondence from Irby to Larry; 1 folder of correspondence from Larry to Irby; and 3 folders of manuscripts by Irby.

 

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Ken Irby. TLS with additions by hand, Mar. 20, 1975, 2 pages.

Ken Irby writes, “its [sic] good to know youre writing a lot and joyously, or anyway, energetically, spiritedly—you & [Robert] Kelly seem to be the present keepers of the flame, certainly the zap hasnt been with me or anyone else I know well.”

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Larry Goodell, ed. Duende, no. 5. Sept. 1964. This entire issue is devoted to publishing Some Small Sounds from a Bass Fiddle by Margaret Randall. Cover collage by Bobbie Creeley (Bobbie Louise Hawkins).

 

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Margaret Randall. TLS from Mexico City, Feb. 26, 1964.

 

Randall writes from Mexico City, “At the recent Encounter of American poets here—on the night designated to the USA—I spoke of about poetry in the US and mentioned DUENDE, WILD DOG, TISH, FLOATING BEAR, SUM, etc. as a new phenomena and the real ‘heart’ of what is going on in current verse publication. Now it seems that Robert Kelly with MATTER and George Bowering with his IMAGO will be added to your ranks. And there are the younger guys in New York with YOWL, etc. At times I think the future is in your hands and people like us should stop trying to break our necks (which we literally do daily!) to raise the quarterly sum needed for efforts like CORNO. You print work of just as high quality and do it in a much more natural way. But of course it becomes a disease, this mag thing, and one tries to keep going as begun.”

The archive contains 2 folders of correspondence from Randall to Larry; a folder of correspondence from Larry to Randall; and a manuscript of So Many Rooms Has a House but One Roof.

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Sergio Mondragón and Margaret Randall, eds. El Corno Emplumado / The Plumed Horn, no. 13. Jan. 1965.

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Duende, no. 6. 1964. This entire issue is devoted to publishing Larry Eigner, The Reception + Poems.

 

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Larry Eigner. TL, 2 pages, Sept. 18, 1964.

Larry Eigner says: “New typewriter, typewriter on which the spacing for me is unfortunately more erratic as icant [sic] come down on space-bar with thumb.”

 

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Larry Goodell, ed. Duende, no. 7. 1965.

This entire issue is devoted to publishing Robert Kelly, Lectiones. Collages by Bobbie Creeley (Bobbie Louise Hawkins).

 

Robert Kelly, ed. Matter, no. 1. 1968. Addressed and mailed to Larry Goodell.

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Robert Kelly. TLS, 2 pages, Aug. 12, 1964.

Kelly writes, “Some time ago, when you sent me Bayes & Franklyn in fact, you asked if I had anything for you…I wonder tho if you’d still like a Kelly Duende? If you’re interested, I’ll send you a group called Lectures, made up of poems in which I tried to exploit the lyrical possibilities of information: that is where the matter is this day, the poetics of information compelling my attention now.”

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Larry Goodell, ed. Duende, no. 8. Sept. 1965.

This entire issue is devoted to publishing Kenneth Irby, Movements/Sequences. With “A Note for Kenneth Irby” by Robert Creeley. Signed.

 

 

Larry Goodell, ed. Duende, no. 9. Sept. 1965.

This entire issue is devoted to publishing William Dodd, Se Marier. William Dodd was a poet from Texas who, like Larry, studied with Robert Creeley. In addition to Dodd correspondence, the archive contains a manuscript of Se Marier.

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Larry Goodell, ed. Duende, no. 10. Sept. 1965.

This entire issue is devoted to publishing Ronald Bayes, History of the Turtle, Book 4. In addition to 2 folders of correspondence from Bayes to Larry; 1 folder of cards; 2 folders of correspondence from Larry to Bayes; and assorted manuscripts; the archive contains original cover art work by Signe Nelson for History of the Turtle, Book 4.

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Larry Goodell, ed. Duende, no. 11. Jan., 1966.

This entire issue is devoted to publishing Frederick Ward, Poems. Edited by Larry Goodell and William Harris. According to Larry Goodell, this is the first book by an African-American poet published in New Mexico.

 

Larry Goodell and William Harris, eds. Duende, no. 12. Dec., 1965.

This entire issue is devoted to publishing William Harris, Poems 1965. Cover by John Czerkowicz. Signed by Harris and Czerkowicz. (William Harris would later go by the name of Latif Harris.)

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Larry Goodell and William Harris, eds. Duende, no. 13. Feb., 1966.

This whole issue is devoted to publishing David Franks, Touch.

 

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David Franks, ed. Magazine, no. 2. ca. 1965. (Each issue of Magazine was alternatively edited by David Franks and Lewis Ellingham.)

 

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Lewis Ellingham. TLS, Mar. 26, 1967.

Lewis Ellingham shares his plans for a new California edition of Magazine. “I want an edition of 500 per issue, which is scheduled to appear … One hundred are committed to the 8th Street Bookstore in New York … My request to you, speaking as publisher, is what kind of distribution would you suggest through the several outlets across the country interested in this kind of thing?”

 

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William Harris, ed. Duende, no. 14. Oct. 1966. This entire issue is devoted to publishing Larry Goodell, Cycles.

This is Larry Goodell’s first book.

 

Larry Goodell. Sun Love Gypsy. 1967.

Side-stapled mimeograph with hand titles and drawn cover. Self-published as Larry Goodell.

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Original artwork for a flyer announcing Larry Goodell’s reading at the Contemporary Art Center, Albuquerque, Nov. 19, 1976.

 

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Detroit Artists Workshop Benefit: Seven Poets, Santa Fe-Albuquerque. Captain Mimeo and the Pepsi Shooter Press Book no. 1. [Duende Press], Mar. 11, 1967.

“Rock—Dance—Poetry—Lights.” The contributing New Mexico poets were Gino Clays Sky, Keith Wilson, Richard Duerden, Max Finstein, Bruce Lippincott, William Harris, and Larry Goodell.

 

 

 

 

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John Sinclair. TLS, Apr. 1, 1967.

Sinclair writes, “The Family Album is a beautiful job and has brought joy to us, both as it is and of course, for what it re-presents to us of the benefit.” In addition to correspondence from John Sinclair, Leni Sinclair, and Robin Eichele, the archive contains publications and ephemera from the Detroit Artists’ Workshop.

 

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Bruce Andrews. APC, postmarked Mar. 11, 1974.

 

After praising the most recent Fervent Valley, Andrews writes: “My own interests I guess run more toward stylistic adventuresomeness & the use of language to show its own reality & importance, stressing its non-representational value & interest, its physicality, its ability to create & be its own context & content, & a stress on elements of texture, densities, silence, directionality, balance, rhythm, etc. by organizing language according to those non-representational elements (& not just using them as ornaments to more prettily get the [outside] message across.) Language, our perception of it & its self-reality & possibilities, is the message, for me. Taking this feeling from wherever I can find it: Stein, Zukofsky, Eigner, Coolidge, Palmer, Grenier, Silliman, contemporary art, etc : maybe we could talk about this sometime, since it largely shapes my perceptions & thoughts about what you are doing w/ the magazine. It’s a question of aims, largely.”

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Larry Goodell to LeRoi Jones [Amiri Baraka]. TLS, Oct. 20, 1963. Carbon.

“Roi—I’m starting a cleanly-mimeod thing here, 15–20 pp./issue, one person/issue … Creeley is helping—advice-wise—and will furnish many addresses. I understand Irby wrote you for addresses for the Wah thing he’s helping with.”

 

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LeRoi Jones [Amiri Baraka]. TLS, Nov. 16, [1963].

Responding to Larry’s Duende launch letter asking for addresses, Baraka replies: “I’ve sent a few names to you, mostly young, though I hope you don’t forget “older” poets whose work has not seen toomuch [sic] light, e.g. Edward Marshall 604 E. 9th St. or Steve Jonas 15 Garden St. Boston … There’s a guy named Ed Sanders, who puts outs Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts who does pretty good things.” Larry also got an address list for Floating Bear to use for sending Duende.

 

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Carol Bergé. TLS, n.d.

Carol Bergé proclaims to Larry: “Meeting you is one of the nicest things ever happened to me. As you can well imagine, I was quite braced for the worst whenever Terry [Abbott] produced anyone or anything. But you are so beautiful.” This letter represents the beginning of an acquaintanceship that Bergé had with Larry for several years.

 

 

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Carol Bergé. TLS, Apr. 1965.

Bergé filled Larry in on what was happening in New York: “here it is: very busy and vivid scenes: the dancers active, at Judson Church mostly, Yvonne Rainer & bob morris gave marvelous performances, also a re-do of Steins’ WHAT HAPPENED which was great, and music much of it, w/the young brash ones such as Phil Corner, M. Goldstein, the auld one Cage, the almost-as-old Maxfield, and have been seeing & speaking together with the Korean composer & thinker, Nam June Paik, i think I mentioned when there. Al Hansen more beautiful than ever in person & in his happenings. this is sure an alive city, this is what winter is, here.”

 

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Carol Bergé, ed. Center, no.1. 1970.

Bergé edited and published Center from 1970 to 1984. It contained a broad spectrum of writing, including avant-garde dance and art criticism.

 

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Gus Blaisdell. “News of the Word, Broadcast,” 1973. Typescript.

Gus Blaisdell (1935–2003) was an Albuquerque writer, teacher, publisher, critic, and friend of Larry’s. He was especially known as the proprietor of the Living Batch Bookstore, where Larry also worked.

 

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Larry Goodell to Doug Blazek. TLS, Jan. 31, 1965. Carbon.

Larry tells Doug, “I am booked for more than I can handle before a trip I’m taking next summer. When I get back I’ll be taking things, I hope. Thank you for sending these; my bias as an editor follows the line of Williams-Creeley. It leads me to want an American diction, whatever it is.”

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Doug Blazek. TLS with drawing, 2 pages, [1964].

Blazek reacts to his work not being accepted for publication: “o.k. yr booked, at least i tried. at least you also hinted that you didnt like the poems. which is close to honesty. i know being an editor one must make up the damnest excuses for not accepting poems, esp for epistilogical [sic] acquaintances.”

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Douglas Blazek, ed. Open Skull, no. 1. 1967.

 

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Robert Creeley. TLS, June 1962. This letter is with items that Larry collected when enrolled in Creeley’s University of New Mexico class.

Creeley provides Larry feedback on his writing: “As time, now a mess, never allowed me to say clearly,—I’m very impressed by what these new (‘white’) poems are doing. That is, it seems that all prior discipline—of formal metric, etc.—is here used together with a greatly relaxed, and so usefully more variable, sense of form.”

Robert Creeley first settled in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1956. He taught at a boy's school until 1959. After receiving his MA from the University of New Mexico in 1960, he continued teaching at UNM. In 1963 he moved to Placitas and then participated in the seminal Vancouver Poetry Conference. His influence upon the New Mexican poetry world and Larry Goodell, in particular, was profound. Larry studied under Creeley at UNM, encouraged his attendance at the Vancouver Poetry Conference, and the two became friends. Larry credits Creeley as “probably saving my life as a poet.”

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Robert Creeley. TLS, Feb. 18, 1963.

Creeley writes Larry about the upcoming Vancouver Poetry Conference: “I really think it will be an exceptional group of people to have in one place at one time. Olson alone would be worth your coming, but Denise Levertov, Duncan, and Allen Ginsberg as well really make it something—and Margaret Avison, a Canadian, is also a shy intelligent woman. Anyhow, I hope it all works out so that you can come up.”

 

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Flyer for Robert Creeley reading at University of New Mexico, Nov. 8, [no year].

 

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Judson Crews. TLS to Larry and John Brandi, July 4, 1978.

Judson Crews (1917–2010) tells Larry and John Brandi: “Carol told me that she delivered my 500 poem manuscript to you while I was in Taos. In the mean time my and Carol’s relationship was ruptured more unpleasantly than I had expected it would be.”

 

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Judson Crews. TLS on back of color photograph of a collage, Nov. 26, 1991.

Crews tells Larry: “I even spend a little money once in a while. I want the new Sylvia Plath bio. Though it would break my back, so near to the Solstice and when I have to pay my car insurance. I will just have to wait until [it] is remaindered—no matter how I love that lady.”

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4-page catalog from Judson Crews's Motive Book Shop in Taos.

The catalog primarily lists books by Crews and Mason Jordan Mason, but also lists items by Robert Creeley, Henry Miller and a few others.

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Mason Jordan Mason. Almost Nothing, Hoot Owl Hyperbole Publications, n.d.

Many in the literary world assume that the widely published and anthologized African-American poet “Mason Jordan Mason” was actually Judson Crews. A claim that Crews always denied.

 

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Judson Crews, ed. The Naked Ear, no. 6. n.d.

 

 

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Ed Dorn. ALS, 2 pages, Jan. 18, 1964.

A letter from Ed Dorn thanking Larry for sending copies of Duende. He also says that Drew Wagnon is reviving Wild Dog.

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Judy Grahn and Wendy Cadden. TLS, [1968].

The author and poet is a longtime friend of Larry’s. She played a vital role in the history of second wave feminist, gay and lesbian activism. In this early letter sent from San Francisco, she tells Larry: “I’ve become overtly political to do any good writing, hope to swing back some from that soon, it really fucks yr perspective, just absorbing all that godamned information.”

 

 

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Judy Grahn. A Woman is Talking to Death. The Woman’s Press Collective, 1974.

 

 

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Original artwork for a reading by Drummond Hadley at The Central Torta, Albuquerque, Feb. 23, 1979 and St. John’s College, Feb. 25, 1979. Flyer made by Larry Goodell. According to Larry “[John] Brandi may have done the border.”

Drummond Hadley was another fellow Vancouver Poetry Conference attendee. Larry has said of Hadley: “A dear lifelong friend. A great American Poet. Simply the greatest Rancher Poet of all time whose stunning delivery of his poems, sometimes memorized, sometimes with guitar, remains unequaled in our poetry world.”

 

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Lyn Hejinian. TLS, envelope postmarked July 18, 1975.

Hejinian writes to Larry: “The stay in San Francisco was nice—I’d been suffering from art despair just before—what-the-fuck and why-the-fuck and who-needs-it etc. The loss of faith is terrible, and it seems that if art isn’t made with a sense of authority, some kind commanding largeness, it fades out altogether.”

 

 

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Anselm Hollo. TLS, Dec. 2, 1964.

Hollo ends his letter by saying, “Generally, there’s some sense of an opening-up here now, a kind of ‘thaw’ perhaps, but the lack of strong & active outlets, publishers/magazines/ etc. still makes itself felt; one or two things starting up, or starting again—Gael Turnbull’s ‘migrant press’ among them So. we’ll see.”

 

 

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Anselm Hollo. Tumbleweed. Weed / flower Press, 1968. Wrappers. Inscribed to Larry Goodell, Jan. 4, 1969. Approx. 325 word TLS laid in.

 

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d.a. levy. PCS, n.d.

levy inquires of Larry, “wd you consider an issue of Duende ALL CLEVELAND POETS or BUD HASSINKS NOTEBOOK FRAGMENTS if i can translate enough of them---“

 

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d.a. levy, ed. [The Marrahwanna Quarterly]. The Mary Jane Quarterly, vol. 2, no. 1. 1966.

d.a. levy, ed. [The Marrahwanna Quarterly]. The Mary Jane Quarterly, vol. 2, no. 1. 1966.

This is from an edition of 200 copies. Letterpress cover and mimeograph. Published by Renegade Press.

 

Clarence Major, ed. Coercion, no. 4. Winter 1965.

Includes a substantial article on d.a. levy’s Renegade Press.

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Eileen Myles. “Write in Myles in 92” campaign flyer.

In addition to a folder with correspondence and manuscripts from Eileen Myles, the archive also contains a folder with items from Myles’s 1992 campaign for President of the United States.

 

 

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Maureen Owen. TLS, Sept. 25, 1980.

Maureen Owen tells Larry: “So today I am all excited as Kulchur Press has just gotten advanced copies to me of my book HEARTS IN SPACE. It just looks terrific. I didn’t think I’d be so excited. What a kid! I am. Even a publication party at Gothem [sic] in late Oct. HA! Is this the ground I walk on? I don’t think so! Did I write all those poems!???”

 

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Bill Pearlman. TLS, Feb. 13, 1975.

Along with Larry, Charlie Vermont and Stephen Rodefer, Bill Pearlman was one of Fervent Valley’s editors. Duende Press also published Bill Pearlman’s first prose book Inzorbital (1967). Pearlman writes to Larry, “Depression really setting in down here I guess the self learns to mother its own difficulties only yesterday sitting by the Big Muddy dreaming of riverboats in the briar patch & the swampglow led to believe there was a whole new ballgame emerging no telling where I think the CIA is down my back for anti-corporate activity.”


The archive contains five folders of correspondence from Pearlman to Larry, a folder of correspondence from Larry to Pearlman, and assorted manuscripts.

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Poster for “Wherever She Blows” at Old Towne Studio, Mar. 29–31, Apr. 5–7, 1968. “Theatrical Poetry / Mime / Mixed Media” by the Universal Mind Dance.

According to Larry’s blog: “At one point poems on paper torn apart as being read, spotlight at random on Mel Buffington, Bill Pearlman and Larry Goodell.”

 

 

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Charles Potts. TLS with feather taped on it, Jan. 3, 1972.

The poet Charles Potts founded the small magazine Litmus as well as the Litmus Press. He also appeared in several issues of Fervent Valley. Potts writes to Larry, “wow yeah, gino [Clays Sky] sent me a copy of the ball tournament thing [The Ball Tournament Specialist published by Duende in 1973]. it is terrific. working with othr people does slo things a bit, i got a coupl real hands selling adds [sic] and whooping it up around here, getting a chick to handl layout so i can spend time editing and working on the circi and distrib.”

 

 

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Ann Quin. TLS, 2 pages, Sept. 13, 1965.

The British experimental writer Ann Quin (1946–1973) was introduced to Larry by Robert Creeley during one of her visits to Placitas. They became close and dear friends. (The archive contains six folders of correspondence between the two of them from 1965 to 1973.) Here she writes to Larry, “Good to hear from you, tho devastated that moonflowers show no */*/*/*/*/*/*/. Needless to say I miss N.M. desperately; the full moon and sun % divided. Instead there is a vertigo of the ego, and that division between being actor and spectator + coping with newyorkcity inferno of hubways, immigration officefull of kafkaofficials, many priests like effigies awaiting their turn.”

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Kell Robertson. TLS with drawing, June 14, 1973.

Robertson writes: “Heres some poems like you wanted or at least I hope yu wanted. It was good to see you. The minute you left a whole herd of MorePeople I hadn’t seen in a long time showed up and we drank and smoked all day and I am kind of fucked up.”

Poet, songwriter and singer Kell Robertson (1930–2011) was often referred to as a “cowboy poet,” however he preferred be called an “outlaw poet.” He began the mimeograph magazine Desperado in 1969. Printed by Ben Hiatt, the magazine published many of writers of the San Francisco Poetry Renaissance. He was a long-time friend of Larry’s and appeared in three of the four Fervent Valleys. The archive contains three folders of correspondence from Robertson to Larry; one folder from Larry to Robertson as well as a folder with Robertson manuscripts.

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Stephen Rodefer, ed. Fervent Valley, no. 4. Summer 1974.

Contributors to this issue include Charles Olson, Stephen Rodefer, Frank O’Hara, Bill Berkson, Charles Potts, Larry Goodell, Philip Whalen, Fielding Dawson, Bill Pearlman, Anne Waldman, T.S. Eliot, Groucho Marx, Gregory Corso, Ford Madox Ford, Robert Creeley, Charlie Vermont, Simon Ortiz, Marcel Duchamp, Michael McClure, Allen Ginsberg, Geoffrey Young, Jack Hirschman, Gerard Malanga, Taylor Mead, and David Franks, among others. Mimeographed with offset cover by George Grosz.

 

 

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Stephen Rodefer. TLS, Apr. 1975.

Writing from Berkeley, Rodefer writes to Larry, “Don’t worry. Be happy. I will help you. If you give a straight reading it will be in the interests of men’s lib. Your friends will have already caught the weird act in Vegas and will be thankful for a quiet evening at home with the important prose writer Lawrence ‘Larry’ Goodell.”

Poet and painter Stephen Rodefer (1940–2015) was a longtime friend of Larry’s. Along with Larry, Charlie Vermont and Bill Pearlman, he was one of Fervent Valley’s editors. Larry and Rodefer toured together doing readings in 1972. In 1976, Duende Press published his translation and commentary of Jean Calais’s Villon and his One or Two Love Poems from the White World. The archive contains two folders of letters and one folder of cards from Rodefer to Larry.

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Flyer for “Poets Read in Support of the Resistance” at the University of New Mexico, Mar. 16, [1974].

Readers included Stephen Rodefer, Charles Bell, Galway Kinnell, and Gene Frumkin, among others.

 

 

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Original artwork for flyer for Larry Goodell and Stephen Rodefer’s reading at the Boston University Nursing School Auditorium, Oct. 10, [1973]. Drawing by Lenore Goodell.

According to Larry: “Steve wrote this crazy blurb for me signed ‘Wolfman Jack’ expanding on something Charlie Vermont said.”

 

 

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Stephen Rodefer, et al., eds. Censored Further West: New Mexico Quarter, Winter–Spring, 1969. Double Issue.

Poems censored by the New Mexico Quarterly and published in this one-shot magazine. Contributors include Michael McClure, Robert Creeley, Stephen Rodefer, Lenore Kandel, David Benedetti, and James Joyce.

 

 

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Ken Saville, ed. The Transient, no. 4. Apr. 1975.

In a private conversation, Larry Goodell called Ken Saville “the d.a. levy of Albuquerque.” In 1972, Larry was the first person that Saville met when he was first finding his way in New Mexico. Currently, Saville is an active artist in Albuquerque.

 

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Leslie Silko. TLS, July 20, [1977?].

Leslie Silko writes to Larry, “I hope sometime you and I can have a cup of coffee alone, instead of there always being 14 other people standing around, or a chore to be tended etc. It seems like you and I have never really had a chance to talk, especially about ideas with poetry and writing.

 

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Gino Clays Sky. ALS written on the back of birth announcement for Krishna Nichole Ai, Feb. 4, 1968.

Gino Clays Sky is a poet and author perhaps best known for his novel Appaloosa Rising: The Legend of the Cowboy Buddha (Doubleday, 1980) and editing, with Drew Wagnon, Wild Dog (nos. 11 through 18). In addition to being published in Oriental Blue Streak and Fervent Valley, his The Ball Tournament Specialist was published by Duende Press (as Gino August Sky) in 1973. Sky’s longtime friendship with Larry is reflected by the box of correspondence and other items exchanged between the two.

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Drew Wagnon, ed. Wild Dog, no. 6, vol. 1. Feb. 29, 1964.

Over the run of 21 issues, Wild Dog’s editors included Ed Dorn, John Hoopes, Joanne Kyger, and Gino Clays Sky.

 

 

 

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Neal Cassady. TLS to Allen Ginsberg, [1967]. Carbon with additions by hand.

Neal Cassady wrote this letter to Allen Ginsberg, urging him to come to Mexico, while he was staying at Diane Sward [Rapaport]’s apartment in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. This was sent with a TLS from Sward to Larry. Apparently other copies of the letter were also sent to Ginsberg. A slight variant of this letter appears in Cassady’s Collected Letters, 1944–1967.

 

 

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Charlie Vermont and Charlie Walsh, eds. Two Charlies, no. 2 .1973.

 

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Jon Webb. TLS, Feb. 7, 1966, 2 pages.

Jon Webb (1905–1971) and his wife Louise (“Gypsy Lou”) Webb (1916–) founded the Loujon Press and published the essential Outsider magazine. After leaving New Orleans, the Webbs lived throughout New Mexico and Arizona. After relocating to Arizona Jon Webb writes Larry, “We found an old adobe ex-groc. store with living quarters in back and got it for a small down payment and very small monthly payments, about 7 blocks from the university, and from here will publish [Outsider] #4.”

.

 

Philip Whalen. ALS, Oct. 19, 1963. 2 pages.

Philip Whalen writes to Larry, “I’ll be glad to send you stuff for DUENDE—I have a novella or short-story or something, 16 pages prose— + sundry poems.” Whalen was published in Fervent Valley, no. 4. Summer 1974.

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Jonathan Williams. TLS, Dec. 22, 1966.

Jonathan Williams writes Larry, “Please excuse my stupid inability to sit down and at least thank you for sending on the most recent issues of Duende. This peripatetic life of mine is hard on me and hard on my friends. I do apologize.”

 

 

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Keith Wilson. TLS with addition by hand, May 6, 1975, 2 pages. Letter also contains mss. “Drowned Woman.”

Keith Wilson writes Larry: “My mind is, at times, of the 13th century. I think these thoughts. Usually, I touch something, a stone tomb or cross, something and I dream lives full of blood and giving, fighting and yet they are happening inside me, as if I were there—life has been very hard, too—many shortages and much aloneness—also many good times.

The native New Mexican poet Wilson contributed to Fervent Valley and also to Duende’s Detroit Artists Workshop Benefit: Seven Poets, Santa Fe-Albuquerque. The archive contains correspondence and manuscripts from Wilson.

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Keith Wilson. Sketches for a New Mexico Town. Prensa de Lagar / Wine Press, 1966. Wrappers. First edition.

 

Gene Frumkin and David Johnson, eds. San Marcos Review, vol. 2, no. 1. 1979. Keith Wilson is featured in this issue.

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Bill Thompson, Rebecca Day, Judy Thompson eds. The Tolar Creek Syndicate, [no. 1?], n.d. Postmarked and mailed to Larry Goodell, May 1968. Keith Wilson is the Consulting Editor.

 

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Richard Morris, The Camels Hump, no. 5. [ca. 1967]. Features a poem series by Besmilr Brigham. Mailed to Larry Goodell, March 17, 1967.

 

Ward Abbott, ed. The Desert Review, Fall 1967.

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Norman Moser, ed. Illuminations, no. 4. Winter 1968–1969. ALS from editor to Larry Goodell laid in.

 

Ron Anthony Punnét, ed. The Ninth Circle, Jan. 1967.

.

Carlos Reyes, ed. Potpourri, vol. 1, no. 2. Summer 1964.

 

Holmstrand, James, Laura Chester, and Geoff Young, eds. Stooge, no. 6. 1972.

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Fred Wah, ed. Sum, no. 1. Dec. 1963.

Wah was one Larry’s fellow students from the Vancouver Poetry Conference (English 410).

 

 

David Tammer, ed. Symptom, no. 1. Dec. 1965.

“This issue dedicated to “the notion / idea of Larry Goodell / editor DUENDE Placitas, New Mexico.”

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Steve Katona, Neil Nelson, and Berry Hickman, eds. The Question, vol. 1, no. 1. May 1965.

 

Flyer drawn by Kush [Steven Kushner] for the Cloud House’s, San Francisco, “Walt Whitman’s All Day Celebration,” May 31, [no year].

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Flyer for Michael McClure’s Poetry Center reading at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Civic Center, Mar. 23, [1966].

Design and artwork by Wes Wilson. Photograph by Larry Keenan of McClure with autoharp given to him by Bob Dylan.

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“Lawrence Ferlinghetti Reading His Poetry,” at the Rising Sun Studio, Sante Fe, NM, Apr. 20, [1975]. Published by John Brandi’s Nail Press as a “A Tooth of Time poster.”

 

Phillip Foss, ed. Tyuonyi, no. 1. 1985.

 

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c

Flyer for Nathaniel Tarn’s reading at the Downtown Center for the Arts, Albuquerque, Mar. 22, 1981.

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Flyer announcing the premiere of Andy Warhol’s Vinyl with Gerard Malanga and Warhol’s Poor Little Rich Girl with Edie Sedgwick, at the Astor Place Playhouse, New York City, June 19–20, 1965.

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Books, pamphlets, broadsides, and magazines

There are approximately 750 books, pamphlets, and broadsides, plus 300 magazine titles comprising 1100 issues.

Larry Goodell in front of the infamous filing cabinets in the back of the Living Batch Bookstore in Albuquerque, 1988 (photo by Corey Krasko).

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Book authors and editors

Alexander, Paul
Anderson, Wendell B.
Apollinaire, Guillaume
Ashmore, David
Baca, Jimmy Santiago
Bakken, Dick
Barnard, Mary
Bartlett, Lee
Basinski, Michael
Bathurst, Bill
Baton, Maisha
Baxter, Glen
Bayes, Ronald H.
Beach, Mary
Bee, Susan
Beene, Gregory
Belli, Giuseppe Gioachino
Beltrametti, Franco
Benedetti, David
Bennett, John
Bentley, Jon Gill
Bergé, Carol
Berkson, Bill
Bernstein, Charles
Berrigan, Ted
Bigelow, Anita 
Bird, Leonard
Blaisdell, Gus
Blaser, Robin
Blazek, Douglas
Boer, Steve
Boland, Evan
Bold, Alan
Bottone, Joe
Bowen, Frances
Brandi, John
Brenner, Summer
Breton, André
Briddell, Don
Brigham, Besmilr
Bright, Susan
Brodey, Jim
Bromige, David
Bronk, William
Broughton, James
Brown, Nathan
Bruchac, Joseph
Bryan, J.B.
Buffington, Mel
Bukowski, Charles
Bunting, Basil
Burbank, Jim
Burke, Clifford
Butts, Mary
Byrd, Bobby
Canadé, Eugene 
Caplan, Ronald
Cardona-Hine, Alvaro
Carey, Steve
Cassady, Carolyn
Cassady, Neal
Cavafy, C.P.
Chester, Laura
Church, Peggy Pond
Cirocco, Bill
Clark, Tom
Clark, Tony
Clancy, Patrick 
Clausen, Andy
Coleman, Victor
Collom, Jack
Congdon, Kirby
Coolidge, Clark
Corman, Cid
Corso, Gregory
Creeley, Robert
Crews, Judson
Crockett, Eleanor Earle
Cross, Victoria
Crow, S.M
Cuelho, Art
Curl, John
Curtis, Walt
Dawson, Fielding
de Swann, Sylvia
Deemer, Bill
Deutsch, Joel
Dickinson, Steve
Dietz, Chris
Dodd, Bill
Dorn, Edward
Dougherty, Mary
Douglas, Max
Dowden, George
Duerden, Richard
Duncan, Robert
Dusenbery, Gail
Eigner, Larry
Elmslie, Kenward
Enslin, Theodore
Eshleman, Clayton
Fagin, Larry
Federman, Raymond
Felger, Richard
Ferlinghetti, Lawrence
Fields, Rick
Finlay, Ian Hamilton
Finstein, Max
Fowler, David Gene
Fowler, Gene
Frampton, Hollis
Frumkin, Gene
Frym, Gloria
Fulton, Len
Gaburo, Kenneth
Gale, Vi
Gierach, John
Gilfillan, Merrill
Ginsberg, Allen
Goldfarb, Sidney
Goodell, Larry
Goodell, Lenore
Grahn, Judy
Grauerholz, James
Graves, Robert
Gray, Darrell
Greasybear, Charley John
Gregorio, René 
Greenberg, Alvin
Greene, Jonathan
Greenwald, Ted
Gregory, Michael
Griffin, S.A.
Guravich, Donald
Gurney, Kenneth P.
Hadley, Drummond
Haines, John
Hall, Walter
Hardin, Glenn
Harris, Jim
Harris, Latif
Harryman, Carla
Hart, Howard
Hawkins, Bobbie Louise
Hawkins, Wm.
Hazen, Barnaby
Heath, Jennifer
Hejinian, Lyn
Hiatt, Ben L.
Hoagland, Tony
Holbrooks, Doris Fields
Hollo, Anselm
Holsapple, Bruce
Holthaus, Gary H.
Hornick, Lita
Howe, Susan
Hugo, Richard
Huncke, Herbert
Huntress, Diana
Hyner, Stephen
Imsunstar
Irby, Kenneth
Johnson, Ronald
Jones, Donald
Kandel, Lenore
Kashner, Sam
Katzman, Allen
Kelly, Robert
Kerouac, Jack
Kissam, Edward
Kiviat, Erik
Knoll, John
Koh, Jee Leong
Koller, James
Kryss, T.L.
Kyger, Joanne
Lally, Michael
Lamadrid, Enrique R.
Lamantia, Philip
Levertov, Denise
levy, d.a.
Lifshin, Lyn
Litz, James C.
Loeffler, Jack

 

Loewinsohn, Ron
Logan, John
Long, Haniel
Lorde, Audre
Luschei, Glenna
Lyon, Danny
Lyons, Kimberly
Macker, John
Mackie, James
Macleod, Norman
MacNaughton, Anne
Madueño, Amalio
Maher, Janet
Mairena, Ana
Marchman, Fred
Mares, E.A.
Mariah, Paul
Marín, G. Varela
Marlatt, Daphne
Marshall, Jack
Martin, Peter
Mason, Mason Jordan
Mathews, Harry
Matos, Daniel
Mattingly, George
Maybe, Ellyn
McCarthy, Gail
McClure, Michael
McCook, Kendall
McCord, Howard
McDonald, Mary
Merrill, Jo
Merwin, W.S
Miles, Josephine
Miller, Brown
Morris, James Ryan
Mottram, Eric
Moulder, John
Mudd, Harvey
Myles, Eileen
Nickell, Joe
Norman, Glenn
Norse, Harold
Norton, Joshua
Noyes, Stanley
Obermayr, Ray
O’Hara, Frank
Oldenburg, Patty
Olson, Charles
Oppen, George
Orlovsky, Peter
Ortiz, Simon J.
Ossman, David
Owen, Maureen
Padgett, Ron
Padgett, Wayne
Palmer, Doug
Palmer, Michael
Paquette, John Edward
Para, Nicanor
Parker, Pat
Pavese, Cesare
Pearlman, Bill
Pélieu, Claude
Peña, Hector
Perchik, Simon
Pereira, Teresinka
Perelman, Bob
Perkoff, Stuart Z.
Pessoa, Fernando
Phillpott, Wayne
Piombino, Nick
Plinth, August
Ponsot, Marie
Potts, Charles
Powell, Lawrence Clark
Price, V.B.
Rabbit, Peter 
Ramirez, Sharon
Randall, Margaret
Rane, Bill
Raworth, Tom
Reuben, Charles
Reyes, Carlos
Ricci, Roy
Richmond, Steve
Rios, Frank T.
Robertson, Kell
Robinson, Elizabeth
Robinson, Willie
Roche, John
Rodefer, Stephen
Rodney, Janet
Rollins, Henry
Romero, Leo
Romero, Levi
Rooney, Pat
Rothenberg, Jerome
Rumaker, Michael
Sagan, Miriam
Sakaki, Nanao
Salamun, Tomaz
Samperi, Frank
Sanders, Ed
Sanfield, Steve
Sauls, Roger
Schaefer, Catherine
Schevill, James
Schuyler, James
Schwitters, Kurt
Scibella, Tony
Shields, Bill
Shirley, John
Silliman, Ron
Simon, John Oliver
Sinclair, John
Sky, Gino Clays
Smith, Edward
Smith, Jack
Smith, Phil
Snider-Bryan, Cirrelda
Snyder, Gary
Solt, Mary Ellen
Sowl, Michael
Spicer, Jack
Stageberg, Mia
Stanley, George
Stein, Charles
Sze, Arthur
Tammer, David
Tapahonso, Luci
Tarn, Nathaniel
Taus, Roger
Taylor, Chuck
Taylor, Kent
Tedlock, Ernest
Timmons, Susan
Toth, Steve
Treichler, Martha Rittenhouse
Trice, Arden
Tritica, John
Tucker, Harvey
Uronovitz, B.A.
Valley Jr., R.J.
Valley-Fox, Anne
Vega, Janine Pommy
Veitch, Tom 
Vermont, Charlie
Violi. Paul
Wagner, D.r.
Wah, Fred
Waldman, Anne
Wakoski, Diane
Wantling, William
Ward, Ed
Warsh, Lewis
Weber, Mark
Weeks, Ramona
Weigel, Tom
Weil, James L.
Welch, Lew
Welsh, Lawrence
Whalen, Philip
Whitman, Walt
Whitney, J.D.
Wickert, Max
Wieners, John
Wild, Peter
Wilk, David
Willems, J. Rutherford
Williams, Jonathan
Wilmarth, Richard
Wilson, Keith
Wilson, Robert A.
Winans, A.D.
Witherup, William
Waldrop, Keith and Rosmarie
Wodening, Jane
Woolf, Douglas
Wyatt, Andrea
Wylie, Andrew
Young, Geoffrey
Zukofsky, Louis

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Magazines

A Nosegay in Black
A Poetry News Letter.
[Published by The
      Desert Review Press.]
A: A Journal of Contemporary Literature
Abacus
Adventures in Poetry
Agenda
Albatross
Albireo Quarterly
Alcheringa: Ethnopoetics
Aleph
All As One: Poetry By and For New Mexicans
Ally
Am Here Forum
Amazing Rayday: Secret Comic
Amazon Quarterly: A Lesbian-Feminist Arts Journal
American Poetry
American Standard
Ante
Athanor
Attaboy!
Audit
Bachy
Back in the Alley: North Texas Street
      Poetry and Prose
Bad Breath
Bean News
Beatitude
Beatlick News
Before Columbus Review
Best Friends: Poems and Drawings by
      Women from Albuquerque
Bezoar
Big Sky
Binturong
Blackberry
Blake Times
Blitz / Mad Virgin!
Border
Boulder Express
Bowery / West: The Gathering Tribe
Bulletin from Nothing
Bums in Space (Everyone Has the Right
      to Orbit)
Café Solo
Caim
Camels Coming Newsletter
Camels Coming
Canyon Cinema News
Captain May I
Caterpillar: A Gathering of the Tribes
Censored Further West: New Mexico
      Quarterly
Center
Centering
Chameleon
Cloven Hoof
Clues
Coercion
Combat
Contact/II
Copula
Creedences
Dacotah Territory
Desperado
Dogtown
Earth
El Corno Emplumado / The Plumed Horn
Eleven
Elizabeth
Everyman
Filmmaker’s Newsletter
Fingers of Silence
Fire Exit
Fish Drum Magazine
Fits
Flow Shot
Foot
Free Poems Among Friends
Friendly Local Press
From a Room with no Windows
From a Window
Front Door
Fuck You/ a Magazine of the Arts
Fuck!
Gay Sunshine
Goat’s Head
Grand Union
Grande Ronde Review
Grist
Growhole Basics
Hanging Loose
Hardware in Now Softwear
Head
Henry Miller Memorial Library Newsletter
High Performance
Hollow Orange
Howling Dog
Huevos
Hyperion
Hyphid
If it Doesn’t Fit, Force It!
Illuminations
Input
Interstate
Intransit
Intrepid
Isthmus
IT
Joglars
Kayak
Kudzu
Kulchur
Kyoi-Kuksu: A Journal of Backcountry Writing
L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E
Land’s End
Latitudes
Litmus
Living Batch News
Longhouse
Longshot
Loon
Love
Magazine
Manroot
Margins
Matter
Mesilla Press Pamphlet Series
Midwest
Mile High Underground
Milk Quarterly
Montagna Rossa
Moravagine
Morkville
Mt. Aukum Review
Mulch
New America: A Review
New American & Canadian Poetry
New Blood
New Collage
New Kauri
New Wilderness Letter
New World Journal
Ninth Circle
Norteast Rising Sun
North American Ideophonics
Occurrence
Oink!
Ole
Open Skull
Open Space
Origin
Orogrande
Out Loud: The Free Monthly of Los Angeles
      Area Poetry Events

 

Out of Sight
Out There
Outlet
Pages
Pembroke Magaine
Penumbra
Perspectives
Pliego
Plumbers Ink
Poetry Flash: The Bay Area’s Poetry Review
      & Literary Calendar
Poetry Review, University of Tampa
Poetry: So What?
Poets at Le Metro
Poets Who Sleep / Workshop
Potpourri
Prosodia
Puerto del Sol
Quark
Réactions Gazette Littéraire Internationale
[Reagan Discovered to Be Robot!]
Red Weather
RFD (Reckless Fruit Delight)
Ripple
River Styx
Rivoli
Road Apple Review
Rocky Ledge
Rocky Mountain Review
Rottenrap
Rutabaga: Poetry of the Rutabaga Party
Sailing the Road Clear
Salt Lick
Salted Feathers
Salted in the Shell
San Francisco Oracle
San Marcos Review
Schist
Schmuck
Seared Eye
Sipapu
Small Press Review
Software
Sol Tide
Some / Thing
Something Else
South Ash Press
Southwest Women’s Poetry Exchange
Southwestern American Literature
Southwestern Discoveries
St. Andrews Review
Star-Web Paper
Stars and Scars
Stone Drum
Stooge
Stroker
Sum
Sun: The Warren Forest Sun of Detroit
Swollen Fingers Review
Symptom
Tamarind
Tansy
Telephone
Tellus
Temblor
The Boston Eagle
The Camels Hump
The Coldspring Journal
The Desert Review Penny Poetry Sheet
The Desert Review
The Drop City Newsletter
The Eggandwe
The Eight Pager a Happening in 8 Parts
The Floating Bear
The Goodly Co
The Greenfield Review
The Grin Press
The Hoodoo Times
The Improvisor: The Magazine of Free
      Improvisation
The Insect Trust Gazette
The Journal
The Kyoto Review
The Lamp in the Spine
The Legion of Charlies
The Magdalene Syndrome Gazette
The Margarine Maypole Orangoutang
      Express
[The Marrahwanna Quarterly]. The Mary
      Jane Quarterly
The Middle R
The Naked Ear
The Open Letter
The Outsider
The Perodical Lunch
The Poetry Project Newsletter
The Prod
The Question
The Review
The Rio Grande Writers Newsletter
The Rivers Meeting Project
The San Francisco Bark
The Silent Ear
The Spirit that Moves Us Magazine
The Subversive Agent
The Taos Review
The Temple / El Templo
The Tolar Creek Syndicate
The Transient
The Trembling Lamb
The Unspeakable Visions of the Individual
The Way West Underground
The World
The Wormwood Review
The
Theo
This
Thunderbird
Tish
Toothpick, Lisbon and the Orcas Islands
Topo
Tortilla
Tottel’s
TRA Toward Revolutionary Art
Trace
Truck
Tucumcari Literary Review
Twin Peaks
Two Charlies
Tyuonyi
Un Poco Loco
Unicorn Journal
Unmuzzled Ox
Vagabond
Vort
Weed
West Coast Poetry Review
Westminster Concours
Whe’re/
Wild Dog
Wildflower
Win Magazine
Wind
Wood Ibis
Word Press
Word Works
Word
Work
Workshop
Xizquil
Y’Bird
Yolanda Pipeline’s Magazine
Yugen

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Books and magazines with contributions from Larry Goodell

6 Poems by Larry Goodell
Adobe Walls: An Anthology of New Mexico
      Poetry
Albuquerque Living
AlBUzerxQUE
Am Here Forum
Artspace
At Heart
Blue Grass
Blue Mesa Review
Bums in Space (Everyone Has the Right
      to Orbit)
Caterpillar
Cental Avenue
Chameleon
Chokecherries
Cielo Azul/Blue Cello
Conjunctions
Contact/II
Criss-Cross Communications
Dodeca: A Monthly Review of Poets & Poetry
Don’t Believe the Hype
Dream Sheet
Exquisite Corpse
Fire, Ashes, Snow
Fish Drum Magazine
Fixed and Free Poetry Anthology 2015
Focus 101: An Illustrated Biography
      of 101 Poets of the 60’s and 70’s
Four Postcards by New Mexico Artists
High Performance
How to Make a Life as a Poet
Howling Dog
Huevos
If it Doesn’t Fit, Force It!
In Like Company: The Salt River Review &
      Porch Anthology
In the West of Ireland: A Literary Celebration
      in Contemporary Poetry
Infolio
Jump the Border! Bisbee Poetry Jazz Pachanga
La Llorna…

 

Laundromat
Luminous Night
Malpais Review
Manilla: An Envelope of Writing & Art
New America: The Energy Issue
New Mexico Poetry Ranaissance
New Mexico Quarterly
Pocket Anthology: 1998 Albuquerque Poetry
      Festival
Puerto del Sol
Seers
Sin Fronteras: Writers Without Borders
Sol Tide
Southwestern American Literature
Southwestern Discoveries
Stooge
Sulfur
Summer Anthology 1992
Symptom
Tarasque
Telephone
The Face of Poetry
The Indian Rio Grande: Recent Poems
     
from 3 Cultures
The Margarine Maypole Orangoutang
      Express
The Más Tequila Review
The New American Poetry Circuit
The President
The Promise of Winter
The Rag
The Short Story Review
The Signpost
The Taos Review
The Way West Underground
The
Three Performers
Truck
Tumble Words: Writers Reading the West
Unexpected Events: Poems from Writers in
      New Mexico
Voices from the Rio Grande

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Contact at Granary Books