Archives & Collections

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Granary is a dealer in literary and art archives and libraries from the sixties forward. We work to place such collections into important institutional libraries and have worked with dozens of writers, artists, and publishers toward this end.

Clients include:

Ed Sanders, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Ed Dorn, Bobbie Louise Hawkins, Anselm Hollo, Michael Lally, Gerrit Lansing, Kit Robinson, Johanna Drucker, David Bromige, Bottle of Smoke Press, John Furnival, Norma Cole, Kevin Killian, Dodie Bellamy, Douglas Crase, Pierre Joris, Susan Stewart, Barbara Henning and Long News in the Short Century (literary magazine archive), Summer Brenner, Charles North, Paul Violi, Don Byrd, Susan Bee, Trevor Winkfield, Arthur Sze, Mei-mei Berssenbrugge, John Koethe, Edith Schloss Burckhardt, Michael Gizzi, Kenward Elmslie, Gloria Frym, Douglas Woolf, Joe Brainard, Larry Goodell/Duende, The Robert C. Morgan Conceptual Art Collection, Patty Oldenburg, Maureen Owen, Blind Date (literary magazine archive), Janet Hamill, Andrew Schelling, Turtle Point Press, Bardo Matrix/Ira Cohen/Gnaoua/Dana Young, Michael Heller, Lewis Warsh, Robert Dash, Richard Foreman (Ontological-Hysteric Theater), Thom Gunn, Maggie Paley, The Poetry Project at St. Mark’s Church (literary organization archive), Woodland Pattern (literary organization archive), Jerome Rothenberg, David Antin, Charles Bernstein, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E (literary magazine archive), Lawrence Alloway, Tony Zwicker, Kathleen Fraser, Robert Creeley, Ninja Press, Carolee Schneemann, Benny Andrews, Leslie Scalapino, Ann Lauterbach, Clark Coolidge, Ray DiPalma, Marjorie Welish, Susan Howe, Bernadette Mayer, Jane Wodening, M/E/A/N/I/N/G (art journal archive), Journal of Artists’ Books (art journal archive), A.I.R. (art gallery archive), Burning Deck Press, Ron Padgett, Joanne Kyger, and Susan King. 

Placements include:

The Library of Congress, Beinecke Library at Yale University, Butler Library at Columbia University, Fales Library at NYU, Mandeville Special Collections Library at UCSD, Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley, Berg Collection at New York Public Library, John Hay Library at Brown University, Lilly Library at Indiana University, Memorial Library at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Green Library at Stanford University.

Please contact us if you wish to offer or acquire such material.

 

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Robert C. Morgan Conceptual Art Collection

Robert C. Morgan Conceptual Art Collection

Robert C. Morgan (b. 1943) is an internationally renowned American art critic, art historian, curator, lecturer, poet, and painter. He completed his dissertation, “The Role of Documentation in Conceptual Art: An Aesthetic Inquiry,” at New York University (School of Education) in 1978. It was the first dissertation on Conceptual Art in the U.S. and was later rewritten, updated and published as Conceptual Art: An American Perspective (McFarland & Company, 1994).

The present collection springs from Morgan’s assiduous research and writing, and provides copious evidence of and discerning insight into the enduring phenomenon of Conceptual art, with particular attention to Lawrence Weiner, Robert Barry, Peter Downsbrough, John Baldessari, Dan Graham, Douglas Huebler, Seth Siegelaub, Allan Kaprow, Joseph Kosuth, Sol LeWitt, and Ed Ruscha, to name a few. The collection includes artists’ books, monographs, catalogs, cards, posters, recordings, correspondence, manuscripts, typescripts, and so forth, and represents the work of more than 100 artists, writers, curators, and editors.

This archive is sold.

"A Secret Location" Archive

"A Secret Location" Archive

The Archive from "A Secret Location" was collected by a reclusive New Jersey inventor and offers a rare glimpse into the diversity of poetic doings and material production that is the Small Press Revolution. It provides a rich gathering for framing an understanding of the various drifts, swirls, and eruptions in the poetry and art firmament of the era, including: Beat Generation, Counterculture, New York School, Venice West, San Francisco Renaissance, Wichita Vortex, Black Mountain, Mavericks, Hippies, Diggers, and related iterations that inform, incite, and inspire one another and the culture at large in ways we are only now beginning to fully grasp. 

This archive is sold. 

Steve McCaffery Archive

Steve McCaffery Archive

The Archive offers a distinct opportunity for rich scholarly exploration into concrete, sound, and language poetry through published and unpublished manuscripts, correspondence, drawings, journals, sketchbooks, audio/video recordings and ephemera.

“Though he would be among the first people to point out the inherent problems with the terminology, poet and scholar Steve McCaffery is one of the major architects of postmodern Canadian literature and was a major player in the Canadian avant-garde of the 1970s. With fellow poet bpNichol, he formed the Toronto Research Group in 1973 ... With Nichol, Paul Dutton and Rafael Barreto-Rivera, McCaffery also formed the highly influential sound poetry collective, The Four Horsemen.

McCaffery’s writing, both creative and critical, is concerned to some extent with going beyond the sentence and the word, beyond syntax.”

— Ryan Cox, “Trans-Avant-Garde: An Interview with Steve McCaffery,” Taxi Online Edition, Winter 2007/2008

The collection is available.

Telephone Books and Magazine

Telephone Books and Magazine

Granary Books is pleased to offer for sale a comprehensive collection of Telephone Books and magazine. The collection contains 34 titles, many with copies of both regular and special editions, as well as 19 issues of the magazine.

Telephone magazine ran for 14 years, from 1969 to 1983, with 19 issues. The magazine began as a means to publish lesser-known poets from Owen's home base in New York City, where she moved in 1968 with Lauren Owen (who was from Tulsa, and suggested they move to the city to see friends Ron Padgett, Dick Gallup, and Ted Berrigan). With the support of Anne Waldman, Larry Fagin, and Tom Veitch at The Poetry Project, Owen learned to run the Gestetner mimeograph upstairs in the church. There, she printed the first eight issues of the magazine, typing up the stencils in her railroad apartment as she raised her two sons.

Owen called the magazine Telephone in part because of the regional social differences she noticed in poetry communities. She remembers that while her usual habit was to drop in on folks in the Midwest and West Coast (where she was from), in New York City, the telephone was a necessary prelude given the nocturnal schedules of her poet friends. To echo the telephonic theme, Owen printed the magazine on legal-size paper that reminded her of the telephone booths that dotted New York City at the time (Interview with M.C. Kinniburgh).

Owen's vision for Telephone was a literal telephone book of poets, that included as many people as possible. A single issue could house up to 90 contributors, and approximately 630 unique contributors appeared in the magazine over the years. Many of these contributors later had their manuscripts published as Telephone Books, an imprint that Owen began in 1972 and continued well into the 2000s, with a shared mission to publish experimental and under-published work and distribute it generously.

Inventory of comprehensive collection here. The collection has been sold; Individual copies of items may be available. 

Woodland Pattern Archive

Woodland Pattern Archive

Woodland Pattern Book Center has transcended its critical role in the arts ecosystem in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin area to become one of the premier literary arts centers in America. The Archive is a comprehensive record of all aspects of Woodland Pattern's diverse programming and provides a rich opportunity for research and scholarship. Its holdings offer a unique insight into a wide range of topics from recent American literary performance and publishing to an in-depth view of the machinations of a grassroots non-profit arts organization.

This archive is sold.