Electric Tulips 5.1 with an appreciation by Alessandro S. Strega and accompanied by divers notes & drawings from the poet's archive. Phillip Gallo. [Privately Printed]. 2015.
Electric Tulips 5.1 with an appreciation by Alessandro S. Strega and accompanied by divers notes & drawings from the poet's archive. Phillip Gallo. [Privately Printed]. 2015.
Electric Tulips 5.1 with an appreciation by Alessandro S. Strega and accompanied by divers notes & drawings from the poet's archive. Phillip Gallo. [Privately Printed]. 2015.
Electric Tulips 5.1 with an appreciation by Alessandro S. Strega and accompanied by divers notes & drawings from the poet's archive. Phillip Gallo. [Privately Printed]. 2015.
Electric Tulips 5.1 with an appreciation by Alessandro S. Strega and accompanied by divers notes & drawings from the poet's archive. Phillip Gallo. [Privately Printed]. 2015.
Electric Tulips 5.1 with an appreciation by Alessandro S. Strega and accompanied by divers notes & drawings from the poet's archive. Phillip Gallo. [Privately Printed]. 2015.
Electric Tulips 5.1 with an appreciation by Alessandro S. Strega and accompanied by divers notes & drawings from the poet's archive. Phillip Gallo. [Privately Printed]. 2015.

Electric Tulips 5.1 with an appreciation by Alessandro S. Strega and accompanied by divers notes & drawings from the poet's archive.

[Privately Printed], 2015. Item #3123

Hand-sewn on tapes by Campbell-Logan Bindery, with printed dust jacket, 7 1/2 x 13 in., 36 pp. including a double-gatefold center spread. Conceived, written, designed, and printed letterpress from handset type and polymer plates on Zerkall Book White and Cream by Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press. The typeface for the poem in the gatefold, printed in eight colors, is Permanent Headline Open from the foundry Ludwig & Mayer. 

The book features a dialogue between an imaginary poet and critic regarding the poem, "Electric Tulips 5.1." Gallo plays both these roles, and the essay titled Future Preterite by Alessandro S. Stompando adds a further layer of ambiguity and anachronism: the piece is meant to evoke an essay by James Joyce, in which he praises his own Ulysses while writing under a pseudonym in a Sylvia Beach publication. This essay computer-typeset in Eras, one of the first typefaces to be produced in both digital and metal form.

This is from an edition of 45 copies: 40 press-numbered and signed and five artist proofs, lettered A–E. Housed in a clear plexiglass slipcase. Fine.

Price: $1,000.00

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