Archives & Collections

banner of images from granary books archives

 

Granary is a dealer in literary and art archives and libraries from the sixties forward. We work to place such collections into important institutional libraries and have worked with dozens of writers, artists, and publishers toward this end.

Clients include:

Ed Sanders, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Ed Dorn, Bobbie Louise Hawkins, Anselm Hollo, Michael Lally, Gerrit Lansing, Kit Robinson, Johanna Drucker, David Bromige, Bottle of Smoke Press, John Furnival, Norma Cole, Kevin Killian, Dodie Bellamy, Douglas Crase, Pierre Joris, Susan Stewart, Barbara Henning and Long News in the Short Century (literary magazine archive), Summer Brenner, Charles North, Paul Violi, Don Byrd, Susan Bee, Trevor Winkfield, Arthur Sze, Mei-mei Berssenbrugge, John Koethe, Edith Schloss Burckhardt, Michael Gizzi, Kenward Elmslie, Gloria Frym, Douglas Woolf, Joe Brainard, Larry Goodell/Duende, The Robert C. Morgan Conceptual Art Collection, Patty Oldenburg, Maureen Owen, Blind Date (literary magazine archive), Janet Hamill, Andrew Schelling, Turtle Point Press, Bardo Matrix/Ira Cohen/Gnaoua/Dana Young, Michael Heller, Lewis Warsh, Robert Dash, Richard Foreman (Ontological-Hysteric Theater), Thom Gunn, Maggie Paley, The Poetry Project at St. Mark’s Church (literary organization archive), Woodland Pattern (literary organization archive), Jerome Rothenberg, David Antin, Charles Bernstein, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E (literary magazine archive), Lawrence Alloway, Tony Zwicker, Kathleen Fraser, Robert Creeley, Ninja Press, Carolee Schneemann, Benny Andrews, Leslie Scalapino, Ann Lauterbach, Clark Coolidge, Ray DiPalma, Marjorie Welish, Susan Howe, Bernadette Mayer, Jane Wodening, M/E/A/N/I/N/G (art journal archive), Journal of Artists’ Books (art journal archive), A.I.R. (art gallery archive), Burning Deck Press, Ron Padgett, Joanne Kyger, and Susan King. 

Placements include:

The Library of Congress, Beinecke Library at Yale University, Butler Library at Columbia University, Fales Library at NYU, Mandeville Special Collections Library at UCSD, Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley, Berg Collection at New York Public Library, John Hay Library at Brown University, Lilly Library at Indiana University, Memorial Library at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Green Library at Stanford University.

Please contact us if you wish to offer or acquire such material.

 

Please use legal-size paper for best results if you wish to print PDFs of prospectuses.
Edward Sanders' Recent Publications

Edward Sanders' Recent Publications

Granary Books is pleased to offer for sale recent works by Edward Sanders, including Fuck You/ A Magazine of the Arts, vol. 5, no. 10 (1965/2021), and five limited-edition bardic glyph-books.


This publication of Fuck You was not released as intended in 1966; Sanders had been arrested on obscenity charges, and his lawyers (at the A.C.L.U., which took his case) advised that he cease publishing until the case was resolved. After Sanders won his case, he became busy with the Summer of Love and other projects; fortunately for Fuck You fans, he has revisited this long-awaited issue and it is ready for release. Side-stapled in the spirit of its mimeographed siblings, with work by Charles Olson, d.a. levy, Szabo, Michael McClure, Henry Fainlight, Robert Anton Wilson, and Sanders, the magazine also includes images of the prepared mimeograph stencils and holograph poems that were set to be published decades ago.


The five "bardic glyph-books" included here represent Sanders' ongoing inquiry using the form of the glyph—“a drawing that is charged with literary, emotional, historical or mythic and poetic intensity”—that has been a dimension of his poetry since 1962. He cites Zen rock gardens, the markings on Egyptian tombs and the typographic designs in John Cage’s writings as influences in the development of the form.


Each of these books are presented as unbound leaves and housed in a rigid set-up cardboard box with a title page affixed to the lid, echoing Sanders' own filing systems of sheaves of papers within boxes. As such, these books are primed for reading and reference, given the dense and meaningful subjects they explore—including occultist and folklorist Harry Smith, poet Charles Olson, the history of the Peace Eye Bookstore, "InvPo" or investigative poetics, and the historian Alf Evers.


Sanders brings his characteristic poetics of research, information, organization, and historical insight to these works, which were produced by the author in Woodstock in limited editions ranging from 5 to 50 copies. These glyph-books were produced in the past two years, but compile experiences from much earlier in Sanders' life, from the 1960s onward. At times, pages of glyphs are shared amongst books (such as the Harry Smith and Peace Eye volumes, as well as the final Fuck You), attesting to the interrelatedness of the series.


Available as individual items.

Telephone Books and Magazine (by item)

Telephone Books and Magazine (by item)

This is a list of Telephone Books and magazine titles available as individual items. 

Telephone magazine ran for 14 years, from 1969 to 1983, with 19 issues. The magazine began as a means to publish lesser-known poets from Owen's home base in New York City, where she moved in 1968 with Lauren Owen (who was from Tulsa, and suggested they move to the city to see friends Ron Padgett, Dick Gallup, and Ted Berrigan). With the support of Anne Waldman, Larry Fagin, and Tom Veitch at The Poetry Project, Owen learned to run the Gestetner mimeograph upstairs in the church. There, she printed the first eight issues of the magazine, typing up the stencils in her railroad apartment as she raised her two sons.

Owen's vision for Telephone was for it to be a literal telephone book of poets, including as many people as possible. At times containing up to 90 contributors, approx. 630 unique contributors appeared in the magazine over the years. Many of these contributors later had their manuscripts published as Telephone Books, an imprint that Owen began in 1972 and continued well into the 2000s, with a shared mission to publish experimental and under-published work and distribute it generously.

 

Tom Phillips Short Catalog

Tom Phillips Short Catalog

Granary Books is pleased to offer for sale a number of works by the artist Tom Phillips, including seven of his signed screenprints illustrating Dante's Inferno, as well as signed pages from the Tetrad Press edition of his groundbreaking altered book, A Humument. 

Phillips's translation and illustration of Dante's Inferno by Talford Press in 1983 received the Frances Williams Memorial Prize; Waddington Graphics published a limited signed edition of nine larger screenprints of these striking illustrations. A Humument is an artist's book that Phillips began in 1966 and completed in 2016 in six versions, altering W. H. Mallock's obscure 1892 Victorian work, titled A Human Document, with painting, collage, and cut-up techniques. Retitled A Humument, it was first published as a series of boxed editions of pages, printed by Ian Tyson at Tetrad Press in London.

Read Tom Phillips's biography here, and more about Dante's Inferno and A Humument on specific catalog records. 

The 0 to 9 Collection

The 0 to 9 Collection

Edited by Vito Acconci and Bernadette Mayer, 0 to 9 is widely considered one of the most experimental and influential publications of the mimeograph and small press movement in America. Published in six issues from 1967 to 1969 in New York City, 0 to 9 also published a supplement titled Street Works and several books by Aram Saroyan, Bernadette Mayer, Vito Acconci, and Rosemary Mayer, along with three booklets that constituted Adrian Piper’s first solo exhibition. 0 to 9 was especially engaged in the particulars of the page and inscriptions upon it, emphasizing aspects of performance, minimalism, multi-disciplinarity, and concrete approaches to language. Given small print runs of 100 to 350 copies per issue, the original publications of 0 to 9 are exceedingly rare.

Items within the collection are available as described below. To see PDF of original complete offering, click here.

Angel Hair Collection

Angel Hair Collection

“I met Lewis Warsh at the Berkeley Poetry Conference and will always forever after think we founded Angel Hair within that auspicious moment.” So writes Anne Waldman in her introduction to The Angel Hair Anthology (Granary Books, 2001).

Lewis and Anne were greatly influenced by the poets and publishers attending the twelve-day conference in July 1965, including those variously identified as Beat, Black Mountain, New York School, and San Francisco Renaissance.

Poets such as Gary Snyder, Robert Duncan, Joanne Kyger, LeRoi Jones, Charles Olson, John Wieners, Jack Spicer, Robert Creeley, Allen Ginsberg, Lew Welch, Lenore Kandel, Ted Berrigan, and Ed Sanders, and small presses and magazines such as CFuck You: A Magazine of the Arts, The Floating Bear, White Rabbit, Auerhahn Press, and Locus Solus provided inspirational models. In The Anthology, Lewis Warsh writes: “In a sense doing a magazine at this early moment was our way of giving birth—as much to the actual magazine and books as to ourselves as poets."

By spring 1966, the poets, each age 20, published the first issue of Angel Hair from 33 St. Mark’s Place in New York City. The initial Angel Hair book was released the same year and by 1978 they had published six issues of the magazine, 63 pamphlets, books, and broadsides, and 10 catalogues. In the process, they helped identify and nurture a generation of innovative, ground-breaking poets, writers, and artists.

This comprehensive collection of the Angel Hair publications includes a complete run of the magazine, all 63 pamphlets, books, and broadsides, two of the catalogues, and a small batch of related archival material.

Please click to view and sort by viewing preferences to review the entire collection. The collection has been sold.

Bardo Matrix Collection

Bardo Matrix Collection

This collection contains approx. 43 items published in the 1970s, including books by Paul Bowles, Ira Cohen, Gregory Corso, Diane di Prima, Jane Falk, Charles Henri Ford, Iris Gaynor, Angus MacLise, and Roberto Francisco Valenza, which feature the artwork of Hetty MacLise, Petra Vogt, and Dana Young. The collection also includes pamphlets, broadsides, and ephemera from the Spirit Catcher Bookshop and Bardo Matrix Press, as well as an extremely rare complete run of Ting Pa , MacLise's Tibetan and English-language poetry journal. 

This collection has sold.

Canadian Concrete Poetry Collection

Canadian Concrete Poetry Collection

From an unpublished essay by Steve McCaffery: 

"Emerging in the mid-sixties Canadian concrete poetry is best configured within a wider, international poetics of cultural unrest, expressed by many younger writers in a plurality of unorthodox literary forms around the world. More specifically, however, it arose out of a specific cultural need. A dominant, inward-looking, mythopoetic and largely nationalist aesthetic (expressed at its belligerent and stentorian in the prose of Robin Mathews) had been challenged in Vancouver by Tish, a young group of poets, founded in 1961 and largely gathered around ex-patriot American critic Warren Tallman. Embracing the new American physiologically-based poetics of projective verse, the Tish group offered a radical alternative to Canadian mainstream poetry: the pre-eminence of breath and the syllable in guiding poetic construction, the poem considered both as an open field and a high energy construct proved appealing to a younger generation of west coast Canadian poets. It was this initial ground-breaking intervention that facilitated the intervention of Canadian concrete-visual poetic practice and its articulation onto the wider, international movement to which Concrete Poetry aspired."

The collection is sold.

Dana Young Archive with Brion Gysin, Charles Henri Ford, Ira Cohen, Ray Johnson, David Rattray, and Harold Norse

Dana Young Archive with Brion Gysin, Charles Henri Ford, Ira Cohen, Ray Johnson, David Rattray, and Harold Norse

Dana Young was an essential member of the Kathmandu psychedelic expatriate community of poets, musicians, artists, and spiritual seekers in the 1970s. His poetry and shamanic art blended Eastern spiritual imagery with American pop and consumer culture. He was an active member of the Bardo Matrix collective and is best known for his book Opium Elementals (Bardo Matrix, 1976) that features his beautiful woodblock prints along with two poems by Ira Cohen. He contributed to several other Bardo Matrix publications including Cohen’s Blue Oracle broadside (1975), the frontispiece to Paul Bowles’ Next to Nothing (1976), and Ira Cohen and Roberto Francisco Valenza’s Spirit Catcher! broadside (1976). His artwork also appears in publications such as Montana Gothic (1974) and Ins and Outs (1978). Dana designed the logo (included in the archive) for John Chick’s Rose Mushroom club located at the end of Jhochhen Tole, known as “Freak Street,” in Kathmandu. Most recently, one of Dana Young’s wood block prints was featured on the album cover of the recent release of Angus MacLise's Dreamweapon II.

Materials in the present collection comprise the archive of Dana Young supplemented with letters, photographs, and assorted items from the Ira Cohen archive via Richard Aaron, Am Here Books.

This archive is sold.